4 Reasons Why You Didn’t Get the Job

4 Reasons Why You Didn’t Get the Job

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

4 reasons why you didn’t get the job

josh boesch, LUTZ Talent shareholder

 

Finding a job is a tough process. It can be frustrating to apply for jobs and get rejected, or worse, to never hear anything back at all. There are many reasons why you may not have landed a job. Some reasons are completely out of your control, but sometimes it may be that you missed an essential step in the application process.

Here are 4 reasons why people do not get hired, and what you can do to maximize your chances of employment.

#1-Your Resume Wasn’t Seen

Even if you qualify for a position, there is a chance that your resume could be overlooked. One reason may be that your resume doesn’t reflect your experience as it relates to the job that you are applying for. To avoid this, it is a good idea to make a new resume for each job you apply for. Tailoring your resume to highlight how your experience fills their qualifications, will give you a better chance of moving forward in the hiring process.

Learn more about resume do’s and don’ts to ensure yours is in tip top shape.

#2-The Interview Didn’t Go Well

Being invited for an interview usually means that the organization believes you have the necessary skills for the job. The real purpose of an interview is to see if you are a good fit for the organization. There are many reasons why an interview may take you out of the running for a position. For example, it may come up that you have a conflict of interest. Situations like this are out of your control.

What you can control in an interview is how you interact with the interviewer and any other people you may meet. The best way to rock an interview is to go into it feeling prepared and confident. To do this, take some time to learn about the job, company, and individuals you will meet before you interview.

You can also get additional insights on how to best prepare for your interview by reading the following articles:

#3-The Money

When it comes to hiring, one of the most important considerations for employers is pay rate. If the budget is for an entry-level position, they are expecting to fill that position with someone they can pay at that rate. If you are overqualified, your expected rate of pay is likely higher. If public, make sure that you make it clear to the employer that you will accept the posted rate of pay.  A recruiter can help with ensuring that compensation is not an issue early in the process and can also assist with negotiating the terms of the offer if needed. 

#4-You Were too Late

Showing up late to an interview is an obvious mistake, but did you know you can also show up late to the application? The internet is the most common way to search and apply for jobs. Unfortunately, postings for open positions may stay online long after they have hired someone. If you are looking at a job posting that is more than 30 days old, you may want to double-check with the company to see if they are still hiring. A recruiter can help to keep updated on the general status of a position. 

Each application is different. These 4 reasons why you didn’t get the job may not be the reason every time, but being aware of them may just help you get hired. If you have any questions, or are looking for current opportunities, please contact us today.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.778.7940

jboesch@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JOSH BOESCH + LUTZ TALENT SHAREHOLDER  

Josh Boesch is a Lutz Talent Shareholder with over 14 years of audit and recruiting experience. He heads the Lutz Talent division, a service that helps clients identify “the ideal candidate” to meet their business goals, challenges, culture and vision. His experience as a CPA and his approach to gaining an in-depth understanding of the client’s talent needs, including the skills, experience, cultural understanding and personality fit, has been integral to his success.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Recruiting and Search Services
  • Confidential Replacements
  • Temporary Staffing
  • Salary Reviews
  • Position Description & Advertising Analysis
  • Screening & Selection Assistance
  • Outplacement Services
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Accounting Careers Committee Vice Chairman
  • Institute for Internal Auditors - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • Information Systems Audit and Control Association - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • American Payroll Association - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Association for Corporate Growth - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA, Accounting and Managerial Information Systems, Creighton University, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Volunteer
  • Knights of Columbus, Finance Committee and Membership Vice Chairman

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Spotting IT Risks Before They Become a Problem

Spotting IT Risks Before They Become a Problem

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

spotting it risks before they become a problem

jessica murray, LUTZ TECH account manager

 

With technology being as vital as it is to business, staying ahead of your IT troubles is an essential step to keeping your doors open. Being proactive with your IT goes a long way to preventing breaches of your network and sensitive data. Let’s look at some of the lurking threats to your systems and what you can do to spot them before they become a problem.

Infrastructure Risks

How old your hardware is can pose a risk. Once equipment gets more than a few years old, the manufacturer stops supporting it. The lack of updates means there are fewer people with the skills to fix problems, and it makes them more vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

One example of this is spectre, a security vulnerability that has been identified on chips that are over five years old. Using spectre, hackers can access computer data without you knowing.

It can also be difficult to access data and provide the lightning-fast service that many clients demand, as well as rising maintenance and energy costs. Software is similar in that it is only worthwhile as long as it is up to date. Cisco’s Annual Security Report found that out of the 115,000 devices they scanned, 92% ran software with known vulnerabilities. Upgrading your software and hardware will cost money, but it is much cheaper than a full-scale data breach.

Proper Redundancies

Having redundancies in your system is what keeps you up and running when something goes wrong. If something fails, or part of your system loses power, having a back up is essential to keep business running as usual. For smaller companies, this can be as simple as a spare laptop. More prominent companies require having systems like redundant ISPs, firewalls, and other systems.

Keep your data safe

The only way to ensure that your data will always be there and accessible is to back it up. If you have a disaster strike, are a victim to a cyber-attack, or have faulty hardware, still having access to all your data is essential. Data can be backed up on-site, where your business is located, or offsite, either another remote location or in the cloud. Keeping your data backed up in a variety of ways helps to ensure that you’ll always have it. The 3-2-1 back up strategy, for instance, is where you will keep three copies of your data in two different media, and at least one copy is backed up offsite.

If you need to keep it from prying eyes now, encrypt it. That means all communications in and out of your office need to be encrypted. For the most secure network full disk encryption, where the entire hard drive, including data, files, the operating system, and software is locked up, is a good idea. Most major vendors today offer full disk encryption.

Make sure only the Right People Get Access to Your System

People love to be lazy when it comes to picking passwords. Given a choice, we would use the same ones for almost everything. Having a proper password policy in place is crucial to make sure that the passwords your employees are using aren’t easy to predict. Setting minimum standards for length and complexity, having a system to change those passwords, and making sure that nobody is sharing that information helps to close the door on intruders.

Using tools like multi-factor authentication can help tremendously in keeping unwanted people off of your servers. While just a password can be hacked, it is much harder to fake your geolocation or login behavior patterns. Considering that 95% of cyber attacks are done using stolen login data, adding that extra step to your email, VPN and desktop logon will save a lot of headaches.

Business Continuity Plan with Disaster Recovery Plan

You need to have an answer to the question, “What happens when our services drop?” Having a plan in place gets things moving faster to fix problems and keeps people from panicking.

Business continuity refers to maintaining business functions going or quickly restarting them if something happens. If the power goes out, where will everyone work? Will they go home, to another office, to the nearest Starbucks? How will you access data when part of the network is down? How long can you afford to be down, and how can you ensure you won’t go over that time? Who are you going to call? The better you can answer these questions now, the better off you will be when the worst happens.

Start by identifying these things: the scope of the plan, key business areas, critical functions of your business, identify dependencies you have between regions, find the acceptable downtime, and plan how to maintain operations.

Your disaster recovery plan focuses on getting your IT infrastructure up and running after something happens. If a disaster hits, will you be ready? Can you withstand a fire, flood, or cyber-attack? Do you have your data backed up offsite? Do you have a telephone backup plan? Having effective plans tested and in place will allow you to stay competitive no matter what.

In summary, understanding the risks your company faces relating to its technology is crucial in helping prevent any possible issues before they arise. Staying on top of all of these measures will keep your IT up and running and will instill confidence in your company for your clients and customers. If you need assistance, or if you have any questions, contact Lutz Tech today!

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.514.0000

jmurray@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JESSICA MURRAY + ACCOUNT MANAGER

Jessica Murray is an Account Manager at Lutz Tech. She has over 5 years of experience in the technology field. Jessica is a trusted advisor that sees clients through the full sales cycle. Her responsibilities include developing proposals and providing recommendations to clients to assist them in reaching their business goals.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Client Relations
  • Technology
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Management Information Systems, Briar Cliff University, Sioux City, IA

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

2019 OPPS + ASC Proposed Federal Registers

2019 OPPS + ASC Proposed Federal Registers

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

2019 opps + asc proposed federal registers

kirk delpeRdang, healthcare manager

 

Summary of Major Provisions

These highlights are by no means a comprehensive listing of all provisions within the OPPS Proposed Rule, but provide a listing of significant items applicable to multiple facilities.

 

General

A. Increasing Price Transparency of Hospital Standard Charges: On the heels of the Executive Order on Improving Price and Quality Transparency in American Health to Put Patients First, CMS has proposed a regulation to implement this order.  In CMS’ opinion, this proposed rule enhances the prior agency guidance requiring hospitals to publicize the standard changes in a machine-readable format effective January 1, 2019.  This rule proposes to 1) clarify the definitions of “hospital”, “standard charges”, and “items and services”; 2) require the machine-readable format for standard charges on all hospital items and services; 3) require making public payer-specific negotiated charges for a limited number of “shoppable” services displayed in a “consumer-friendly” manner and: 4) implement a monitoring mechanism for hospital noncompliance and penalties for noncompliance, including warnings, corrective action plans and civil monetary penalties. 

1. Hospital – An institution in any State in which State or applicable local law provides for the licensing of hospitals and which is licensed as a hospital pursuant to such law, or is approved by the agency of such State or locality responsible for licensing hospitals as meeting the standards established for such licensing

Standard Charge – Hospital’s gross charge and payer-specific negotiated charge for an item or service

Items and Services – All items and services (including individual items and services and service packages) provided by a hospital to a patient in connection with an inpatient admission or an outpatient department visit for which the hospital has established a charge

2. The proposal referencing all standard changes would require that hospitals make public their standard changes (both gross charges and payer-specific negotiated charges) for all items and services online in a machine-readable format.

3. Consumer-friendly – What exactly is “shoppable” and “consumer-friendly”? How does CMS attempt to qualify and quantify these criteria?

Shoppable is defined as a service that can be scheduled by a consumer in advance.

CMS goes on to propose the following requirements of hospitals:

– Display payer-specific negotiated charges for at least 300 shoppable services, including 70 CMS-selected services and 230 hospital -selected services. If the hospital does not provide the 70 CMS services, the hospital-selected services must compensate, such that the total of the listing is 300 services.

– Ensure this information is displayed prominently on a publicly-available webpage

– Updated annually

4. Monitoring and Enforcement

– Monitor

– Warnings

– CAP (Corrective Action Plan)

– Monetary penalty – Up to $300/day; publicized on CMS website; Appealable to the ALJ

B. Supervision of Hospital Outpatient Therapeutic Services: CMS is proposing to change the minimum required level of oversight from direct to general supervision for ALL hospital outpatient therapeutic services, ensuring a standard minimum level of guidance. This change is based on studies conducted with respect to the level of service provided between acute-care hospitals and critical access hospitals, which have recently had different levels of enforcement requirements, based on the moratorium on enforcement of this requirement for CAHs.

Prospective Payment System (PPS) Specific

  • Payment Differentials: CMS is proposing to increase the policies to reduce the payment differentials between certain outpatient sites, with the goal of improving the quality of patient care while lowering costs.
  • Changes to the Inpatient Only List: There are proposed changes to the procedures covered by this listing.  For example, CMS is proposing to remove total hip arthroplasty from the inpatient-only list.  However, please review for the proposed Federal Register for a comprehensive listing.
  • Wage Index: CMS is proposing to use the FY 2020 IPPS wage index as the wage index for OPPS.  This includes the IPPS adjustment to address the wage index variations between high and low wage index value hospitals – increasing the wage index for certain low wage index hospitals.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

kdelperdang@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

KIRK DELPERDANG + HEALTHCARE MANAGER

Kirk Delperdang is a Healthcare Manager at Lutz with over 25 years of experience. He provides accounting and consulting services to healthcare and related organizations.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Healthcare Financial Management Association - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Accounting, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • St. Vincent de Paul, Knights of Columbus, Member
  • Active in various youth sports leagues: Aldrich Elementary, Millard Athletic Association, Millard North Schools, Omaha FC, Skutt Catholic High School and YMCA

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We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Rural Health Funding Opportunities

Rural Health Funding Opportunities

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

rural health funding opportunities

amy evanich, healthcare consulting senior

 

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have announced new grant opportunities available to rural hospitals. The grants listed below are available in all 50 states.

 

Rural Health Network Development Planning Program

The purpose of the Network Planning program is to assist in the development of an integrated health care network, specifically with network participants who do not have a history of formal collaborative efforts.

Network Planning goals are:

(i) to achieve efficiencies

(ii) to expand access to, coordinate, and improve the quality of essential health care services

(iii) to strengthen the rural health care system as a whole

Eligible applicants must be rural nonprofit private or rural public entities that represent a consortium/network composed of three or more health care providers. Federally recognized tribal entities are eligible to apply as long as they are located in a non-metropolitan county or a rural census tract of a metropolitan county, and all services must be provided in a non-metropolitan county or rural census tract.

HRSA will invest approximately $2 million for this program that helps rural communities develop integrated health care networks. The deadline to apply is Friday, November 29.

 

Rural Health Network Development Program

The Rural Health Network Development (RHND) Program encourages innovative solutions to local health care needs identified by local communities. It supports rural communities in preparing for changes within the health care environment. Furthermore, the program creates an opportunity for rural health networks to collaboratively address the key priorities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): mental health, substance use disorder, and value-based care.

The goals for the RHND Program are to:

  • Improve access and quality of health care in rural areas through sustainable health care programs created as a result of network collaboration
  • Prepare rural health networks for the transition to value-based payment and population health management
  • Demonstrate improved health outcomes and community impact
  • Promote the sustainability of rural health networks through the creation of diverse products and services
  • Utilize and/or adapt an evidence-based or promising practice model(s) in the delivery of health care services

Diverse network partners may include behavioral health organizations, critical access hospitals, rural health centers, community and social service organizations, and tribal organizations. HRSA will invest $13 million for this program to support integrated rural health care networks that combine the functions of the network entities to address the health care needs of the targeted rural community. The deadline to apply is Monday, November 25.

Rural Health Network Development Planning Program. (2019). Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved on October 14, 2019, from https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=315914

Rural Health Network Development Planning Program. (2019). Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration. Retrieved on October 14, 2019, from https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=HRSA-20-025

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.769.7055

aevanich@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

AMY EVANICH + HEALTHCARE CONSULTING SENIOR

Amy Evanich is a Healthcare Consulting Senior at Lutz with over 10 years of professional experience in the Healthcare industry. She specializes in the areas of medical chart reviews, appeal preparation, Medicare regulation guidance, interpretation and education, and healthcare billing policies and procedures.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Healthcare Reimbursement
  • Audit Response Assistance and Appeal Preparation
  • Medical Chart Review Including Medical Necessity
  • Healthcare Billing
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Registered Nurse (RN)
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), Clarkson College, Omaha, NE
  • Master of Science in Nursing Health Care Administration (MSN), Clarkson College, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Nebraska Action Coalition, Leadership Team

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Telehealth and Telemedicine: What You Need to Know

Telehealth and Telemedicine: What You Need to Know

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

telehealth and telemedicine: what you need to know

kim kaye, healthcare consulting senior

 

Telehealth and telemedicine have made it so providers and patients have a new way to communicate. Telehealth is defined as the provision of healthcare remotely by means of telecommunications technology. Telemedicine is defined as the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients by means of telecommunications technology.

Telemedicine can be performed by different applications, for example, real-time or face to face communication. Store and forward video conferencing is typically used by healthcare providers to share patient diagnostic and treatment information. This is popular with specialties like dermatology, ophthalmology and radiology. Remote Patient Monitoring or ‘telemonitoring’ is a method that allows providers to track a patient’s vital signs and activities from a distance. This is typically used for patients who are at high risk for health-related complications, for example, cardiac patients. The American Medical Association (AMA) reports the top three specialists who use telemedicine the most as of January 2019 are:

  • Radiologists—39.5 percent
  • Psychiatrists—27.8 percent
  • Cardiologists—24.1 percent

Telehealth services bring value to providers and patients in many ways. Telemedicine increases access to care, especially those patients who do not have access to transportation. Studies have shown it improves the quality of care for patients. Telemedicine is cost-effective compared to face to face in-office visits. Patients value the convenience, flexibility and real-time care with their providers.

There are certain barriers to overcome in telehealth. For example, limited access to smartphones and high-speed internet in rural areas. Also, state requirements for licensing and credentialing of telehealth providers vary widely. Lack of reimbursement is a key barrier to the use of telehealth services. Each state has different rules and regulations about the types of services that can be reimbursed by Medicaid. In addition, Medicare strictly regulates the types of providers who are reimbursed for providing telehealth services

Per the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Medicare pays for specific Part B provider services furnished through a telecommunications system. Telehealth services substitute for an in-person encounter, and the beneficiary must go to an originating site for services. An originating site is the location where the Medicare beneficiary gets medical services through a telecommunications system.

To be eligible, the originating site must be located either in a county outside a metropolitan statistical area or a rural health professional shortage area. Authorized originating sites include; physician and practitioners’ offices, hospitals, critical access hospitals, rural health clinics, federally qualified health centers, hospital-based or CAH-based renal dialysis centers (including satellites), skilled nursing facilities, community mental health centers, renal dialysis facilities, home of beneficiaries with end-stage renal disease receiving home dialysis and mobile stroke units.

Distant site practitioners who can furnish and get payment for covered telehealth services (subject to state law) include physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse-midwives, clinical nurse specialists, certified registered nurse anesthetist, clinical psychologists and clinical social workers, registered dietitians and nutritional professionals. Clinical psychologists and clinical social workers cannot bill Medicare for psychiatric diagnostic interview examinations with medical services or medical evaluation and management services. They cannot bill or get paid for CPT codes 90792, 90833, 90836, and 90838.

Per CMS, you must use an interactive audio and video telecommunications system that permits real-time communication between you at the distant site, and the beneficiary at the originating site. Transmitting medical information to a provider who reviews it later is permitted only in Alaska or Hawaii federal telemedicine demonstration programs.

Submit professional telehealth service claims using the appropriate CPT or HCPCS codes. If you performed telehealth services through a store and video telecommunications system, add the telehealth GQ modifier with the professional service CPT or HCPCS code (for example, 99202 GQ). Submit telehealth service claims, using place of service 02-Telehealth, to indicate you furnished the billed service as a professional telehealth service from a distant site. Distant site practitioners billing telehealth services under the CAH Optional Payment Method II must submit institutional claims using the GT modifier. HCPCS code Q3014 describes the Medicare telehealth originating sites facility fee. Bill your Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) for the separately billable Part B originating site facility fee, per CMS.

CMS also noted how the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT Act) statutorily removed the geographic limitations for telehealth services furnished to individuals diagnosed with a substance use disorder (SUD) to treat the SUD or a co-occurring mental health disorder. The change also allows telehealth services for the treatment of a diagnosed SUD or co-occurring mental health disorder to be furnished to individuals at any telehealth originating site (other than a renal dialysis facility), including in a patient’s home. No originating site facility fee is paid when the beneficiary’s home is the originating site. These changes became effective July 1, 2019.

On July 29, CMS proposed the 2020 Physician Fee Schedule rule, which contains new telehealth services covered under Medicare. CMS proposed adding three codes to the covered Medicare telehealth service list:

GYYY1: Office-based treatment for opioid use disorder, including development of the treatment plan, care coordination, individual therapy, group therapy and counseling; at least 70 minutes in the first calendar month.

GYYY2: Office-based treatment for opioid use disorder, including care coordination, individual therapy, group therapy and counseling; at least 60 minutes in a subsequent calendar month.

GYYY3: Office-based treatment for opioid use disorder, including care coordination, individual therapy, group therapy and counseling; each additional 30 minutes beyond the first 120 minutes (List separately in addition to code for primary procedure).

These services are expected to be added to the list of Medicare telehealth services when the final rule is published and would go into effect January 1, 2020.

 

Resources:

CMS Medicare Learning Network MLN Booklet, ICN 901705, January 2019

The National Law Review, Emily H. Wein & Nathaniel M. Lacktman, August 12, 2019

Rural Health Information Hub, Online

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.827.2353

kkaye@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

KIM KAYE + HEALTHCARE CONSULTING SENIOR

Kim Kaye is a Healthcare Consulting Senior at Lutz with 16+ years of experience. She is responsible for providing professional coding assistance, chart audits and chargemaster reviews for clients with a focus on the healthcare industry.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Coding Assistance
  • Chart Audits
  • Chargemaster Reviews
  • Healthcare Consulting
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Certified Professional Coder
  • Certified Evaluation & Management Auditor
  • American Academy of Professional Coders, Member
  • National Alliance of Medical Auditing Specialists, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA, Bellevue University, Bellevue, NE

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850