Is Your Business Making These 4 Major Accounting Mistakes?

Is Your Business Making These 4 Major Accounting Mistakes?

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

is your business making these 4 major accounting mistakes?

jake klabenes, audit manager

 

Business owners often feel rushed. There’s never enough time to get things done; even the priority tasks are a struggle to complete. Sometimes, all that rushing results in mistakes. Here is a list of common accounting mistakes to avoid.

 

1.  Failing to Maintain Accurate Records

If your business has an accounting package, be sure to enter all financial information into the software. If the software doesn’t meet your needs, you may have the wrong program for your business. Even if you are keeping manual records, it’s still imperative that you maintain accuracy. Review the items below to ensure you are keeping proper records.

A.    Enter all cash transactions 

If your cash register is not tied to your accounting software, you need to enter the cash transactions manually. This task should be performed daily, as it is easy to forget a cash transaction 30 days after it occurred. The sooner you enter your transactions, the more precise your records will be.

B.     Enter payables  

Also, when a bill comes in, enter it into your accounting package on the same day. This is the best way to track how much money you need to cover upcoming expenses. When you pay the bill depends on the due date and your cashflow.  

C.     Enter receivables  

If you invoice customers through your accounting software, the receivable should automatically appear. If your software doesn’t generate invoices, you will need to enter the receivables manually. This information will help you forecast your cashflow.

D.    Enter loan information 

If you receive a business loan, be sure to also enter that data into your accounting software. The loan is a liability that will impact your financial reports. Failure to enter information on your loan and its payment will create inaccurate financial statements.

Keeping your records up to date is the only way to know your financial position. Without that information, you aren’t making decisions; you are guessing.

 

2.  Failing to Ask for Help

No one expects a business owner to be an expert in finance or accounting. Yet, many owners fail to ask for help when it comes to financial matters. Not asking questions or getting help could have negative consequences for your business.

E.     Sales Tax  

Make sure you are applying sales tax appropriately, especially if you do business online. Depending on your software, you may need to enter the sales tax separately. Since sales tax laws are becoming more complex, it is essential to get help if you are not 100% sure.  

F.      Business Expense  

You and your business are not one and the same. At least not when it comes to paying taxes. Be sure to separate your business from your personal expenses. If you are unsure about these figures, ask a professional for assistance.  

G.    Payroll 

If you think payroll is easy, think again. Doing payroll is not just about calculating gross wages and subtracting taxes. There are other deductions to consider including HSAs, 401(k)s, child support payments, back taxes, and the list goes on. And that’s just the employee side of payroll. What about business-related expenses like worker’s comp or quarterly tax payments? If you happen to miss a filing date, financial penalties may apply.  

There’s nothing wrong with asking for help. Tax laws are complex, which is why you should talk to a professional when you have a question.

 

3.  Failing to Monitor Finances

Keeping up on the financial condition of your company is one of your primary responsibilities as an owner. To do that, you must have accurate information, which requires reconciling accounts and learning to understand financial statements.

H.    Reconciliation

Reconciliation means checking the information in your accounting system with the information received in your bank or other financial account statements. If the transactions match, the information is considered reconciled or in balance, and the financial data is accurate. 

You may not perform the monthly reconciliation, but you should at least review it every month. Look for any categories that seem over or under what you expected. If entries appear as journal entries, check with the person who created those entries. It could be an indication of fraud.

I.       Financial Statements

Every month, you should review your company’s three primary financial statements:

  • Profit and loss statement (P&L)
  • Balance sheet
  • Cash flow statement

These items should be reviewed after your month-end reconciliation. Schedule time with a professional who can help explain how to use them.

 

4.  Failing to Secure Data

Entering data into your accounting software doesn’t mean you can throw away receipts, documentation or other financial records when you are done. You need to keep these items to use as supporting documentation in case of an audit or to verify data.

J.       Store Records

Copies of financial information that support the accounting entries should be stored in a safe location for a minimum of seven years. Whether you maintain paper files or digitize them, make sure you can easily retrieve them in case of an audit. It is a good idea to file your documents regularly; otherwise, the task will become overwhelming.

You can learn more about storing your tax records here.

K.     Backup Data

Backing up your accounting data should be performed daily. To be sure you have an accessible copy of your data, store your data in the cloud or at another offsite location. That way, a hardware or software failure won’t erase your important accounting information.

Running a business can be rewarding, especially if you have knowledgeable resources to help. At Lutz, our mission is to ease your mind and invigorate your success. Feel free to contact us if you have questions or need accounting assistance.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.463.8989

jklabenes@lutz.us

747 N BURLINGTON AVE

SUITE 401

PO BOX 1317

HASTINGS, NE 68902

JAKE KLABENES + AUDIT MANAGER

Jake Klabenes is an Audit Manager at Lutz with over eight years of tax and audit experience. He specializes in audits of governmental agencies, specifically housing authorities, with additional experience in not-for-profit entities and low income housing tax credit projects.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Audit
  • Financial Statements
  • Public Housing Industry
  • Nonprofit Industry
  • Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Projects
  • Governmental Agency Audits
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • National Association of Housing & Redevelopment Officials - NE Chapter, Member
  • Affordable Housing Association of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting, University of Nebraska Kearney, Kearney, NE
  • MBA, University of Nebraska
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Heartland Pet Connection, Treasurer, Past President

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Supporting Medical Necessity: Is Your Healthcare Organization Compliant?

Supporting Medical Necessity: Is Your Healthcare Organization Compliant?

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

supporting medical necessity: is your healthcare organization compliant?

amy evanich, healthcare consulting senior

 

Submission of complete and accurate medical records is a top priority for all healthcare organizations. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Medically Necessary is defined as services or supplies that:

  • Are proper and needed for the diagnosis or treatment of the medical condition
  • Are provided for the diagnosis, direct care, and treatment of the medical condition
  • Meet the standards of good medical practice in the local area
  • Are not mainly for the convenience for patient or doctor

No hospital, provider, or patient wants to hear that a service is not medically necessary. According to Medicare, this can include services such as:

  • Excessive therapy or diagnostic procedures
  • Hospital furnished services that, based on the beneficiary’s condition, could have been furnished in a lower-cost setting, such as the beneficiary’s home or a nursing home
  • Surgeries that are considered cosmetic
  • Dental services
  • Certain footcare services

As a healthcare organization, some policies and processes can be put into place to ensure medical necessity is being met. Most billing offices struggle to keep up with their day to day work, which can make it challenging to analyze medical necessity; however, this proactive approach should be a priority for your hospital.

So, where do you begin when it comes to looking at medical necessity? First, you can analyze payer websites and the Office of Inspector General (OIG) work plan, which sets forth various projects, including OIG audits and evaluations that are underway or planned to be addressed during the fiscal year and beyond. Secondly, if your healthcare organization has started a new service line or has added a new provider, coder, or biller. Changes such as these are all areas that your hospital should be reviewing to ensure medical necessity is met.

When completing a medical necessity review, the Medicare Coverage Database will have links for Local Coverage Determinations (LCD) and National Coverage Determinations (NCD) to help guide your review including:

  • Indications
  • Limitations of Coverage
  • Documentation Requirements
  • Coding Guidelines
  • Billing Guidelines

Be sure to educate all appropriate team members on the audit findings. Spend time educating the provider regarding what documentation is needed to support the services. Eventually, a re-audit will need to be completed to ensure the necessary changes were made. Understanding and determining medical necessity can be very complex for healthcare team members. Evaluating medical necessity for the services provided on a regular basis is an important safeguard to ensure your healthcare organization is prepared if/when an external audit does occur.

 

References:

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. (2000). Retrieved on February 11, 2020 from cms.gov

Office of Inspector General. (n.d.). Work Plan. Retrieved on February 11, 2020 from https://oig.hhs.gov/reports-and-publications/workplan/index.asp

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.769.7055

aevanich@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

AMY EVANICH + HEALTHCARE CONSULTING SENIOR

Amy Evanich is a Healthcare Consulting Senior at Lutz with over 10 years of professional experience in the Healthcare industry. She specializes in the areas of medical chart reviews, appeal preparation, Medicare regulation guidance, interpretation and education, and healthcare billing policies and procedures.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Healthcare Reimbursement
  • Audit Response Assistance and Appeal Preparation
  • Medical Chart Review Including Medical Necessity
  • Healthcare Billing
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Registered Nurse (RN)
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), Clarkson College, Omaha, NE
  • Master of Science in Nursing Health Care Administration (MSN), Clarkson College, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Nebraska Action Coalition, Leadership Team

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All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Cost Reporting

Cost Reporting

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

cost reporting

KIRK DELPERDANG, HEALTHCARE MANAGER

 

Bad Debts – General

Eligible Medicare bad debts can be claimed for reimbursement through the Medicare cost report. For Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), the reimbursement percentage was at 100% before FY 2013 – since then, in FY 13, it was reduced to 88%, 76% in FY 14, and 65% in FY 15 (the current rate as of this article).

Certain rules that need to be followed in order to claim Medicare bad debt on the cost report. First, bad debt can only be claimed on a cost report that is deemed “uncollectible,” as defined by CMS. Second, it must be related to covered services derived from the deductible and coinsurance amounts. Lastly, sound business judgement should establish that there was no likelihood of recovery at any time in the future.

A provider must also submit the Medicare bad debt in a specific template (more to come), including all data elements such as:

  • Patient identification
  • Date the first bill was sent to the beneficiary
  • The date collection efforts ceased
  • Deductible or coinsurance amount

 

Bad Debts – Cost Report Documentation Requirements & Templates

On August 17, 2018, a new Federal Register requirement was implemented, impacting bad debts for all cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2018 – specifically the documentation and submission requirements.

Excerpt from 83 FR 41677 (August 17, 2018)

“Effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2018, for providers claiming Medicare bad debt reimbursement, a cost report will be rejected for lack of supporting documentation if it does not include a detailed bad debt listing that corresponds to the bad debt amounts claimed in the provider’s cost report.” 

Prior to this new requirement, inappropriate or inaccurate bad debt support “only” resulted in a desk review adjustment.  Now, unreconciled bad debt amounts may lead to a rejected cost report.

 

Home Office/Related Party

Just as Home Offices and management agreements have been around for decades, CMS Pub. 15-I Chapter 10 has been in place, governing the reporting of costs to related organizations.  These related organizations often take the form of a Home Office.  However, these may also be organizations that furnish management services or administrative services, through an agreement between entities.

The evolution of the healthcare industry, specifically with respect to rural healthcare, has forced rural hospitals to find ways to become more efficient and lower overall healthcare costs at their facility.  These advancements, in an ever-changing industry, have some rural facilities engaging in agreements for management and administrative services to save costs.  Medicare is keeping pace with these arrangements in their reviews and cost report submission requirements.

Excerpt from 83 FR 41677 (August 17, 2018)

“Effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2018, for providers claiming costs on their cost report that are allocated from a home office or chain organization that has a different fiscal year end, a cost report will be rejected for lack of supporting documentation if the home office or chain organization has not completed and submitted to the chain provider’s contractor a Home Office Cost Statement that corresponds to some portion of the amounts allocated from the home office or chain organization to the provider’s cost report. 

Based on these new requirements, it would be prudent to have all related party/home office cost support in order when you file your cost report.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

kdelperdang@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

KIRK DELPERDANG + HEALTHCARE MANAGER

Kirk Delperdang is a Healthcare Manager at Lutz with over 25 years of experience. He provides accounting and consulting services to healthcare and related organizations.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Healthcare Financial Management Association - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Accounting, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • St. Vincent de Paul, Knights of Columbus, Member
  • Active in various youth sports leagues: Aldrich Elementary, Millard Athletic Association, Millard North Schools, Omaha FC, Skutt Catholic High School and YMCA

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Assignment of E/M Levels Emergency Room

Assignment of E/M Levels Emergency Room

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

assignment of e/m levels emergency room

nancy thygesen, healthcare manager

 

The hospital must assign Emergency Room Evaluation and Management codes (E/M) codes for all ER visits. The E/M code is billed in Revenue Code 450 –Emergency Room on the UB-04.

Below are a few of the items we see when reviewing Emergency Room records and levels:

  • Hospital approved ER criteria not applied correctly, and the incorrect E/M level is assigned which results in over coding or under coding
  • Incorrect points assigned and therefore the wrong E/M level is billed; many facilities use a point system to assign levels of care based on the services rendered
  • Incorrect E/M level assigned from the computer-generated ER criteria software
  • Documentation/services do not substantiate the E/M level assigned
  • ER Criteria outlines that a level 5 visit (99285) is automatically assigned if the patient is admitted to the hospital or transferred even if the documentation/services provided do not justify a level 5
  • The discharge status code billed does not substantiate the E/M level assigned (i.e., discharge status 01 to home and E/M level 5 assigned)

We recommend all facilities have an ER matrix, ER criteria, or ER acuity sheet that is used to determine the E/M level assigned for each visit rendered in the ER.

The ER matrix/criteria/acuity sheet must be applied consistently to all hospital ER visits. Suggestions for applying the ER matrix:

  1. The staff who assign the ER E/M levels must understand the criteria and the documentation required to substantiate each level
  2. Require the ER Matrix be completed for each ER visit to substantiate the E/M level assigned
  3. Implement a review process to include:
    • Confirmation that the matrix is applied properly and consistently to all claims and the correct E/M level is assigned; a Pre-bill review is recommended
    • Establish a formal process to change an assigned E/M level based on the pre-bill documentation review. Providers and HIM should be involved in establishing the process.
    • Educate the staff who assign the E/M levels and Providers if changes are made in the criteria
    • Educate the staff who assigned the E/M level when the documentation does not substantiate the E/M level assigned
    • Review the ER matrix annually and make updates to the criteria as needed

It is important to have a process in place to make sure the criteria are accurately applied, the correct E/M level is assigned, and reviews are done to assure the documentation and services substantiate the level assigned. These processes will assist in assuring you are receiving the proper payment, not under or over coding, and supporting medical necessity. if you have any questions, please contact us.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.827.2368

nthygesen@lutz.us

NANCY THYGESEN + HEALTHCARE MANAGER

Nancy Thygesen is a Healthcare Manager at Lutz with over 35 years of experience in Health Information Management Consulting. Her primary responsibilities include performing chargemaster reviews and providing coding, reimbursement and educational services for hospitals, physicians and other healthcare providers.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Consulting
  • Health Information Management
  • ICD-10 Coding
  • Chargemaster Reviews
  • Coding
  • Reimbursement
  • Healthcare Educational Services
  • Healthcare Industry
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska Health Information Management Association, Member
  • American Health Information Management Association, Member
  • Registered Health Information Administrator
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • Bachelor’s degree in health information management, College of St. Mary’s, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Church Volunteer

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Lutz adds Adam Pfeiffer and Rachel Wald

Lutz adds Adam Pfeiffer and Rachel Wald

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Lutz adds Adam Pfeiffer and Rachel Wald

Lutz, a Nebraska-based business solutions firm, welcomes Adam Pfeiffer and Rachel Wald to its Omaha office.

Adam Pfeiffer, CPA, joins Lutz’s accounting division as a Tax Manager. He is responsible for providing tax consulting and compliance services to clients with a focus on business income tax for a variety of industries including real estate and restaurants. Pfeiffer received his Master’s degree in accounting from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

As a Data Integrity Assistant, Rachel Wald joins Lutz’s firm administrative department. She is responsible for supporting the firm’s marketing and business development teams in daily administrative activities. Wald’s primary focus is data input and clean up, as well as system data management. Rachel graduated from Bellevue University with a Bachelor’s degree in business and emphasis in marketing.

 

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SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Personal and Business Tax Updates for 2019

Personal and Business Tax Updates for 2019

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

personal and business tax updates for 2019

Steve nebbia, tax manager

 

The sweeping tax changes that were implemented in 2018 signaled a seismic shift in the way individuals paid taxes. However, there aren’t many changes coming for you this year. The IRS rules for 2019 are more of the same, with a few tweaks here and there.

 

A Quick Review of Major Changes From The 2017 TCJA

As you gather your tax documents to take to your accountant, it’s important to review some of the key changes of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) and how they affect the majority of wage-earning Americans.

  • Increased Standard Deduction–married filing joint increased to $24,000, and single filers bumped up to $12,000.
  • Real estate and local tax deductions capped at $10,000
  • Personal and dependent exemption (around $4000) repealed
  • Coverdell and 529 accounts can be used for education from kindergarten through college, instead of just college
  • Mortgage interest payments deductible for up to a $750,000 mortgage, down from $1.1 million
  • Medical expenses are deductible in excess of 7.5% of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI), down from 10%
  • Capital gains, dividends, and Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) all decreased, based on tax bracket and indexed for inflation
  • Decrease of penalty tax for failure to comply with the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
  • Elimination of casualty loss or theft – damages no longer deductible unless the area was part of a Federally recognized disaster area

Tax Tweaks For 2019

These changes to the individual tax code are scheduled to expire in 2025. Only the overhauled corporate tax structures are permanent. Even so, there are some changes for 2019.

  • The standard deduction increases a bit – up to $12,200 for individuals and $24,400 for married couples filing jointly.
  • The penalty for failure to obtain health insurance is repealed–if you decide not to buy health insurance, the IRS won’t charge you for it. However, some states are penalizing individuals for not buying health insurance.
  • Medical expenses are more difficult to deduct. The AGI floor bumps back up to 10%–if your income is $100,000, you have to spend more than $10,000 to get any of those expenses back. If you had $12,000 in medical and dental expenses, you could deduct $2000.

Big Changes To Alimony Reporting For 2019

Prior to 2019, alimony payments were an almost zero-sum game for the IRS – the paying ex-spouse got to deduct the payments from their income, while the receiving ex-spouse paid taxes on the income. The receiving spouse was generally in a lower tax bracket, thus lowering the aggregate taxes for both parties.

The alimony deduction for the paying ex-spouse has been eliminated. That person must claim those payments as income. Also, the ex-spouse receiving the money no longer claims the income. This is a boon to the IRS as the paying spouse is typically in a higher tax bracket.

Business Deduction Changes For 2019

There are also some changes to business and pass-through taxation. Here are some of the highlights.

Qualified Business Income (QBI) Deduction

  • QBI applies to the owners of sole proprietorships, partnerships, S-corps, and LLCs.
  • Section 199A (net amount of income, gain, deduction, and loss) allows up to 20% deduction.
  • Also applies to trusts, estates, and individual taxpayers
  • The maximized deduction could provide a top marginal tax rate of 29.6% (80% of the top 37% marginal rate)

Talk to your CPA if you have questions on this law.

Pass-Through Provisions

The maximum business loss for couples is now $500,000, and excess losses can be carried forward. Separate business activities are to be analyzed accordingly.

Expenses, Depreciation, And Deductions

Qualified property placed in service between 9/17/17 and 1/1/23 is eligible for 100% Bonus Depreciation, with the following step-down amounts, through 2026.

  • 80% in 2023
  • 60% in 2024
  • 40% in 2025
  • 20% in 2026

Section 179 expensing guidelines have implemented these changes.

  • Expense amount limited to $1,000,000
  • Phase-out threshold listed to $2,500,000
  • Qualified real property eligibility has expanded to non-residential real property, including roofs, HVAC systems, and security and fire protection systems.

The IRS has disallowed some of the perks of business ownership, eliminating deductions for entertainment, recreational activities, and membership dues. However, you can still write off the company Christmas party and other team building activities for employees at 100%.

Despite the goal of simplification, completing your income taxes is still a task best left to the professionals. Lutz is here to help you with all the aspects of your financial life, from retirement planning to filing your tax returns.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.778.7949

snebbia@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

STEVE NEBBIA + TAX MANAGER

Steve Nebbia is a Tax Manager at Lutz with over five years of related experience. He provides tax consulting and compliance services to clients with a focus on business income tax for a variety of industries, individual income tax, and trust and estate planning.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Tax Consulting & Compliance
  • Individual & Business Income Tax
  • Trust & Estate Planning
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • Master's in Science of Accountancy, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
  • BSBA in Finance and Accounting, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Omaha Parks Foundation, Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850