2019 Manufacturing Outlook Survey Results

2019 Manufacturing Outlook Survey Results

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

2019 MANUFACTURING OUTLOOK SURVEY RESULTS

ACCORDING TO LEADING EDGE ALLIANCE NATIONAL MANUFACTURING OUTLOOK SURVEY

 

This year’s survey report contains the expectations and opinions of more than 350 manufacturing executives who produce a wide variety of products including industrial/machining, transportation/automotive, construction, food and beverage, and other products.
 

Survey results include:

  • 81% of manufacturers expect revenue to increase in 2019.
  • Optimism rates have increased by more than 12 percentage points over the last two years.
  • The top three priorities for manufacturers in 2019 include growing sales, improving profitability and addressing the workforce shortage.
  • 52% of manufacturers cited labor/talent as their greatest barrier to growth, followed by competition (34%) and profitability (25%).

U.S. manufacturing industry headwinds are significant and include both internal and external issues, such as inventory turnover ratios, expense changes, labor shortages, growth strategies, the price of raw materials and strength of the dollar, and more.

Strategic manufacturers should have ongoing conversations with all of their advisors, including their accounting and tax provider, as to how to overcome these challenges and achieve their business goals.

“There are a range of value-added services we can offer manufacturers, from tax credits to export tax incentives,” said Lutz Partner and manufacturing client group leader, Jim Honz. “What manufacturers cannot afford to do, is take a ‘wait and see’ approach.”

Please click the button below to view the full 2019 Manufacturing Outlook survey results report.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jim Honz

402.492.2121

jhonz@lutz.us

JIM HONZ + TAX SHAREHOLDER

Jim Honz joined the firm in 1984 and currently serves as a Tax Shareholder. His areas of expertise include export tax incentives (IC-DISCs), choice of business entity, and methods of accounting (including Lifo Inventory). In addition, Jim works with tax-exempt organizations on tax and organizational issues.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
  • Silver Medal on CPA Exam for second highest score
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting, Creighton University, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Catholic Charities, Past Board Member/President
  • Nebraska Organ Recovery System, Inc., Board Member/Treasurer
  • Creighton University Financial Advisory Committee, Past Alumni Member Appointed by CU President
  • St. Wenceslaus Church, Elected Parish Council Member (Vice President), Chairman of Finance Committee
  • Creighton University Accounting Department, Past Advisory Board Member
  • SIDs 398 (Pacific Springs) & 189 (Georgetown), Elected Trustee/Chairman
  • NSCPA, Political Education Committee Member

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HASTINGS

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New Phase-In Option for Credit Losses Standard

New Phase-In Option for Credit Losses Standard

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

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New Phase-In Option for Credit Losses Standard

Bank regulators have completed a rule that will allow banks to phase in the capital effect of the new credit losses accounting standard over a three-year period. The relief comes amid growing banker angst about the impact of the sweeping new accounting standard.

 

FASB responds to financial crisis

Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments — Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, goes into effect in 2020 for publicly traded financial institutions. Published in June 2016, the standard replaces existing requirements under U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) that allow banks to estimate losses only after they’re “probable.”

In practice, the existing guidance has often meant that loan losses are accounted for only once borrowers default. During the financial crisis, investors, regulators and banks said loan loss provisions were recognized “too little, too late.”

The updated credit losses standard, often referred to as the current expected credit losses (CECL) standard, is considered the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB’s) signature response to the 2008 financial crisis. The standard applies to all businesses. But it mostly affects banks, particularly how they account for souring loans.

In a nutshell, the CECL standard erases current restrictions on using forward-looking information to calculate loan losses. Instead, banks and other creditors must look to the foreseeable future, assess current conditions, take historical experience into account and come up with a reasonable estimate of expected losses.

The new standard requires banks to estimate and book losses on the day they issue a loan instead of waiting for customers to miss payments to set aside loan loss reserves. The increase in loan loss reserves means banks will have to shore up the capital they hold for regulatory purposes.

In turn, when banks increase their capital levels, they have less money available to lend to customers. The standard also may force banks to curtail lending to riskier customers. So, banks have been pressuring the FASB, regulators and lawmakers to either change parts of the CECL standard or stall its implementation.

 

Standard sparks controversy

The drumbeat against the CECL standard has intensified as banks prepare to follow the sweeping new rules. Recently, the American Bankers Association (ABA), several individual banks and some lawmakers have appealed to the FASB and the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC). In December, a group of congressional leaders sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who chairs the FSOC, to delay the compliance date.

“Banks have long been concerned about CECL’s cost and impact on our ability to serve our customers and communities, particularly in times of economic stress,” ABA president Rob Nichols said in a statement. “That’s why ABA believes CECL must be delayed until a quantitative impact study can be conducted and the economic consequences of the accounting standard are fully understood.”

 

Regulators offer partial relief

In response to these appeals, banking regulators have finalized a rule that aims to help banks deal with the regulatory capital impact of the CECL standard. It offers banks the option to phase in over three years the “adverse effects” on regulatory capital that banks expect to feel when they adopt the standard.

“We’re very appreciative the agencies have moved forward by finalizing the rule,” said James Kendrick, vice president of accounting and capital policy at the Independent Community Bankers of America. “We would have rather seen five years. But we think three years would be welcomed by most, if not all, community banks.”

The regulatory rule was a joint effort between the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Federal Reserve and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC). The final rule largely follows a proposal issued by the regulators in April 2018.

When the regulators issued the proposal, Regulatory Capital Rules: Implementation and Transition of the Current Expected Credit Losses Methodology for Allowances and Related Adjustments to the Regulatory Capital Rules and Conforming Amendments to Other Regulations, for public comment, many banks applauded the move to offer relief.

However, several banks and professional groups asked to be allowed to phase in the capital hit over five years instead of three. Others took the opportunity to air grievances about the standard in general, calling on the regulators to force the FASB to make changes to the standard or conduct a formal cost-benefit analysis of the impact of the standard before allowing it to be implemented.

 

Are you ready?

The option to phase in the CECL standard over three years is an important step toward easing its adoption. The phase-in is also expected to give regulators time to understand how the new accounting rule could affect banks’ day-to-day operations. For more information on how this standard affects your organization, contact an accounting professional.

 

©2019 THOMSON REUTERS

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Why Investors Should Own International Stocks

There is a tendency for investors to focus their attention and investment dollars on assets located within the United States. This tendency is well documented and is referred to as Home Country Bias. People are generally more…

read more

2019 Manufacturing Outlook Survey Results

This year’s survey report contains the expectations and opinions of more than 350 manufacturing executives who produce a wide variety of products including industrial/machining, transportation/automotive…

read more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Identifying CAMs: The New-and-Improved Auditor’s Report

Identifying CAMs: The New-and-Improved Auditor’s Report

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

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Identifying CAMs: The New-and-Improved Auditor’s Report

Public company auditors have been conducting test runs to help them add critical audit matters (CAMs) to the auditor’s report. To comply with this new Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) requirement, the Center for Audit Quality (CAQ) has found that auditors must apply significant judgment and communicate effectively with management and audit committees.

 

What are CAMs?

PCAOB Release No. 2017-001, The Auditor’s Report on an Audit of Financial Statements When the Auditor Expresses an Unqualified Opinion and Related Amendments to PCAOB Standards, was published in 2017 to make the report more useful to investors.

The main provision of the rule requires auditors to describe CAMs, which are the most complicated issues that arose during the audit of the company’s financial statements. CAMs are defined as matters that:

  • Have been communicated to the audit committee,
  • Are related to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements, and
  • Require an auditor to make a subjective decision or use complex judgment.

Although auditors may currently report CAMs on a voluntary basis, it will be required for audits of large accelerated filers for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 2019. Large accelerated filers are public companies with market values of $700 million or more.

Audits of smaller public companies must follow the new rule for fiscal years ending on or after December 15, 2020. In both cases, auditors must identify each CAM, detail the reasons why it was selected and back up their assertions using relevant financial information.

The PCAOB doesn’t provide a list of possible CAMs or prescribe a specific number of CAMs that must be stated in an auditor’s report. In fact, in some audits, it’s possible that an auditor will determine that there are no CAMs to report.

 

How are CAMs identified and reported?

The new PCAOB rule represents a major change to the brief pass-fail auditor’s report that has prevailed since the 1940s. To get a head start on revising their reports, auditors of some public companies have conducted test runs of the CAM requirement. This has allowed them to practice how to identify and draft CAMs, as well as how to engage with management and audit committees about CAMs, prior to the effective date.

In December 2018, the CAQ, an affiliate of the AICPA, published Critical Audit Matters: Lessons Learned, Questions to Consider, and an Illustrative Example. The CAQ report presents early lessons from auditors’ test runs. It also provides an illustrative example of a CAM (goodwill impairment) and a set of questions to foster an understanding of the impact that CAMs will have on the audit process.

The CAQ says, “It can be difficult to strike the right balance between the CAM description in the auditor’s report and information in the company’s disclosures, to convey concisely the essence of why a matter is a CAM, and to describe how the CAM was addressed in the audit in a manner that is informative, but not overly technical.”

Among other things, the CAQ advises auditors to communicate with company management and audit committees “early and often” in the process of identifying CAMs. This communication can help management consider the need for modifications to the company’s disclosures in relation to areas likely to be CAMs.

Any modifications to a company’s disclosures should be based on management’s reporting requirements. Modifications also should be independent of the auditor’s identification of CAMs.

 

Prepare for questions

Once the new auditor’s report goes into effect, investors and other stakeholders are likely to ask questions about CAMs. Companies should be ready to answer these questions. Management can prepare by openly discussing these matters with auditors. In addition to fully understanding why those matters involved especially challenging, subjective or complex auditor judgment, public companies should consider choosing a liaison who can communicate with outside stakeholders to ensure clear, consistent messaging.

 

©2019 THOMSON REUTERS

RECENT POSTS

Why Investors Should Own International Stocks

There is a tendency for investors to focus their attention and investment dollars on assets located within the United States. This tendency is well documented and is referred to as Home Country Bias. People are generally more…

read more

2019 Manufacturing Outlook Survey Results

This year’s survey report contains the expectations and opinions of more than 350 manufacturing executives who produce a wide variety of products including industrial/machining, transportation/automotive…

read more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

AICPA to Align its Auditing Standards With Public Company Standards

AICPA to Align its Auditing Standards With Public Company Standards

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

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AICPA to Align its Auditing Standards With Public Company Standards

The AICPA’s Auditing Standards Board (ASB) is taking steps to enhance the consistency of financial reporting between public and private companies. A new omnibus auditing standard will cover standards on related parties, communications with audit committees, and consideration of fraud in a financial statement audit.

 

Syncing the standards

Auditors of public companies are required to follow the standards set by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). But auditors of private companies generally adhere to the ASB guidance. In some cases, the existing auditing standards may differ.

In January, the ASB voted to issue a final standard to more closely align its guidance with the PCAOB’s standards. Statement on Auditing Standards (SAS) Omnibus Statement on Auditing Standards — 2019 will primarily amend:

  • AU-C Section 550, Related Parties,
  • Clarified Statement on Auditing Standards (AU-C) Section 260, The Auditor’s Communication With Those Charged With Governance, and
  • AU-C Section 240, Consideration of Fraud in a Financial Statement Audit.

The final standard is based on Proposed SAS Omnibus Statement on Auditing Standards — 2018, which the AICPA published in November 2017. The proposal was issued after the AICPA completed its Clarity Project in 2012. The Clarity Project was carried out to make the AICPA’s audit guidance easier to understand and use.

 

Promoting audit consistency

The ASB believes that the amendments will improve the quality of private company audits. The PCAOB originally based its standards on ASB guidance. However, in recent years, the PCAOB has enhanced its rules to help prevent and detect accounting scandals like Enron and WorldCom.

Specifically, the PCAOB’s Auditing Standard (AS) 2410, Related Parties, toughened the requirements for auditors when they review the business deals of a company’s officers and directors for conflicts of interest. And AS 1301, Communications with Audit Committees, strengthened communications that auditors have with audit committees.

The ASB’s omnibus standard adds communication requirements regarding the auditor’s views about a company’s significant unusual transactions. The changes will require auditors to communicate the potential effect of uncorrected misstatements on future financial statements.

In addition, the new ASB standard adds a requirement to look for previously unidentified or undisclosed related parties or significant related-party transactions. The requirement is intended to enhance the auditor’s response to the risks of material misstatement associated with related-party transactions, taking into account the information gathered during an audit.

 

Coming soon

A final standard will be issued early in the year in conjunction with an updated standard on auditor reporting. The ASB wants the standards to have the same effective dates to improve their implementation. That date is expected to be no earlier than for financial statement audits of periods ending on or after December 15, 2020.

 

©2019 THOMSON REUTERS

RECENT POSTS

Why Investors Should Own International Stocks

There is a tendency for investors to focus their attention and investment dollars on assets located within the United States. This tendency is well documented and is referred to as Home Country Bias. People are generally more…

read more

2019 Manufacturing Outlook Survey Results

This year’s survey report contains the expectations and opinions of more than 350 manufacturing executives who produce a wide variety of products including industrial/machining, transportation/automotive…

read more

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

6 Things Your Accountant Needs to Prepare Your 2018 Tax Return

6 Things Your Accountant Needs to Prepare Your 2018 Tax Return

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

6 THINGS YOUR ACCOUNTANT NEEDS TO PREPARE YOUR 2018 TAX RETURN

JUSTIN KORTH, SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

 

Tax season is just around the corner and it’s that time again to start preparations for your 2018 filing. Working directly with an accountant to help file your taxes is a great way to stay organized while ensuring you meet all federal and state filing requirements.

However, to get the most value when hiring a tax expert this year, it’s important that you provide them with the information they need to do their job successfully. Here are six things your accountant needs when preparing your 2018 tax return and how you can help them maximize your return.

 

Completed Tax Organizer

Tax organizers are great for keeping your records up-to-date year-over-year. More important though, a completed tax organizer gives your accountant the information they need to build your individual tax return effectively. The completed organizer should contain details such as your current address, occupation, yearly expenses, charitable contributions, and other relevant information that’s required to prepare your individual tax return.

 

Changes in your Investment Activity

Any time you change your investment activity from one year to the next, it’s important that you let your accountant know about it. Changes can include opening and closing interest-bearing and dividend-paying investments and reporting any new capital gains you’ve received. Updates to your accountant should also include any new foreign investments you’ve made over the course of 2018. This will ensure you’re accurately reporting all investment income, but also may help you claim additional deductions when applicable.

 

All Government Forms (Where Applicable)

Depending on your individual tax scenario, there may be a variety of forms that will be received and need to be reported to the IRS. To aid your accountant in this effort, all government forms received relevant to your filing should be submitted to them. Most commonly, these forms will include W-2’s, 1099s, and K-1s.

 

Itemized Deductions (Where Applicable)

A common misconception is that all deductible expenses need to be calculated meticulously throughout the year, logged efficiently, and reported along with your personal income. This isn’t the case for many people, however. Depending on your individual circumstances, it may not be necessary to compile or report any itemized deductions to your accountant. If you know you’re planning on taking the standard deduction for your filing year, it won’t be necessary to send these itemized deductions to your accountant. Your accountant can help you decide whether to use standard or itemized deductions.

 

Clear and Open Communication

You should strive to build a long-lasting relationship with your accountant by actively engaging them and discussing your financial needs and wants. Accountants are not only available to help you file, but they’re also a great resource to help you take advantage of all the tax deductions available to you. Communication goes both ways, however. You should be readily available to help answer any questions they have about your finances throughout the year and always keep the lines of communication open.

 

Early Filing

In most cases, the earlier you provide information to your accountant, the sooner the tax return can be completed. With a condensed filing season, information received later generally takes longer to complete.

 

Working with an accountant to help prepare your 2018 tax return can be beneficial if you give them the information they need to be successful. By following these six steps when working with a tax professional, you’ll be able to accurately file your taxes in a timely manner while maximizing the value of your return.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.514.0007

jkorth@lutz.us

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JUSTIN KORTH + SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Justin Korth is a Staff Accountant at Lutz with over 3 years of experience in taxation. He specializes in individual, business, and fiduciary income tax returns, estate and business planning, and taxpayer representation on IRS matters. In addition, he provides consulting on small business accounting and payroll tax reporting.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Income, Business, and Fiduciary Income Tax Returns
  • Taxpayer Representation
  • Estate and Business Planning
  • Payroll Processing
  • Payroll Tax Reporting
  • Client Accounting Services
  • Small Business Accounting Consulting
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member, Career Committee
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting and Finance, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • UNO Young Alumni Academy, Member
  • St. Vincent de Paul Knights of Columbus, Member
  • Youth Catholic Professionals, Parish Ambassador

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

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Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

What is a Qualified Opportunity Fund?

What is a Qualified Opportunity Fund?

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

What is a Qualified Opportunity Fund?

JOE DONOVAN, TAX MANAGER

 

A Qualified Opportunity Fund (QOF) is an entity formed to invest in qualified opportunity zone property. These “Opportunity Zones” are designated by the state with the purpose of incentivizing investments through QOFs to enhance the economic development of a distressed community via job creation and property investment. It’s important to understand what an opportunity zone is and how it can benefit your business and the community. Here’s what you need to know:

 

Quality Opportunity Fund (QOF) Defined

When an entity is created with the goal of investing in opportunity zone properties that are qualified, it is known as a qualified opportunity fund or QOF. In order to qualify for preferred treatment, 90 percent of the assets held by a QOF must be in qualified opportunity zone property. Assets can include equipment, commercial real estate, business property, QOZ stock and partnership interests.

 

Benefits of Qualified Opportunity Funds

QOFs have a whole host of benefits that you can take advantage of for tax purposes including:

  • Capital gains deferment. With a QOF, you can delay the taxes owed on realized capital gains that would normally be recognized on your tax return. Capital gains are allowed to be deferred until December 31, 2026. 
  • Receive a step up in basis. On top of the ability to defer the recognition of your capital gain until December 31, 2026, you also have the ability to reduce the total gain recognized on these capital gains. If the investor holds the QOF for 5 years they are able to reduce their realized gain by 10%.  If the QOF is held for 7 years they are allowed to reduce their gain by 15%. In short, you could possibly only pay tax on 85% of the original gain a full 7 years after it was realized (or in December 31, 2026, whichever is first). 
  • Avoid tax on the appreciation in your QOF Investment. When you stay in the QOF investment for at least 10 years, you may avoid tax on the appreciation of the QOF Investment by making an election with your return. This benefit is in addition to the step up in basis on the original gain.  An example would be a shareholder who sells $200,000 which they had $100,000 in basis in.  Normally this would result in a $100,000 capital gain being taxed in the current year.  If the gain is properly invested in a QOF the taxpayer will not pay tax on the $100,000 gain realized in the current year.  If they hold the QOF for 7 years they will only pay tax on $85,000 of the gain (85% of the$100,000 gain) in 2026.  Furthermore, if the QOF investment increases to $500,000 in ten years, the owner will not have to pay tax on the $400,000 of appreciation in the QOF from $100,000 to $500,000. 
  • You’re enhancing the local economy. QOFs do more than offer tax savings. These funds help boost the local economy of distressed communities by creating jobs and helping businesses and the community thrive.

 

QOF Disclaimer to Consider

Taxpayers can not only defer their taxable capital gains when they invest in a QOF, but also can reduce future tax on appreciation in their QOF Investment. However, it’s important to note that there are many issues to consider with qualified opportunity zone investing. Consult with a tax professional who has expertise and experience in handling QOF and capital gains, since Qualified Opportunity Zones have specific rules that can make quantifying opportunities challenging. A tax professional can help you consider the opportunity costs and benefits for investing in these types of funds.

 

If you’re looking for a way to invest in a distressed community, enhance the growth of a local community and even defer your capital gains taxes, then QOFs may be an ideal option to achieve these goals. However, it’s critical to consider the costs and benefits associated with investing in QOFs. By understanding the basics and consulting with a tax professional, you can better determine if an investment in a QOF is right for you and your business.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.827.2047

jdonovan@lutz.us

JOE DONOVAN + TAX MANAGER

Joe Donovan is a Tax Manager at Lutz with over six years of experience in taxation. He primarily focuses his time on tax compliance, research, and consulting assistance to privately held companies in a variety of industries including real estate development and construction.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
  • Masters in Science of Accountancy, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850