Accounts Payable Automation: 3 Ways QuickBooks Can Help

Accounts Payable Automation: 3 Ways QuickBooks Can Help

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AUTOMATION: 3 WAYS QUICKBOOKS CAN HELP

Accounts payable automation: 3 ways quickbooks can help

lauren harRis, senior accountant

 

Did you resolve to pay bills on time in 2021? Do you have a plan to do that? If you are using QuickBooks, there are three ways you can use automation to help you achieve your goal: reminders, memorized transactions, and scheduled reports.

Set Reminders

If you have more than a handful of bills to pay every month, it is a wise idea to set Reminders in advance of the due date so you can process the payments on time. To turn these on in QuickBooks, you open the Edit menu and select Preferences, click on Reminders, then on the Company Preferences tab. QuickBooks displays a list of actions, some of which must be completed by specific dates (like Bills to Pay and Memorized Transactions Due). You can enter the number of days before the due date that you want the reminder to appear in your list.

Click on My Preferences in the same window and make sure to check the box for Show Reminder List when opening a Company file. You can always access the Reminders list from the Company menu, but this option will display the reminders list first thing when you open QuickBooks.

Memorized Transactions

Bill payment is a tedious, repetitive task. For the most part, you write checks or authorize payments to the same individuals and companies regularly. Some amounts vary and others may stay the same.

QuickBooks allows you to “memorize” vendor transactions. This is useful for recurring transactions to the same vendor. This feature allows you to save those transaction forms (I.e., bills, vendor checks) so you can call them up when they are due, edit the amounts as needed, and send them. You can even designate the transactions to be created automatically if the details do not change from month to month.

To create memorized transactions, you create a transaction such as a bill or vendor check and click Memorize from the top ribbon. QuickBooks gives you a few choices when setting up the memorized transaction.

  • Add it to your list of Reminders so you can edit it before sending or forego that option.
  • Add it to a Group of similar memorized transaction that you use.
  • Let QuickBooks automatically enter the transaction if the amount is always the same, like a loan or rent payment.  

Scheduled Reports

If you have assigned bill payment duties to an employee, you can create a schedule to memorize and deliver two reports to him or her: A/P Aging (Detail or Summary) and Unpaid Bills Detail. You can specify an email address and date/time for the reports to be delivered.  If you have these two critical reports sent to both yourself and your employee responsible for bill payment, it is unlikely that you’ll miss a payment.

Scheduling reports takes some setup work in QuickBooks We can help with this if you are interested in setting these up.

We can walk you through any or all of these automated processes and answer questions you might have about your company’s accounts payable tasks. We can also help you explore other ways you can automate accounting tasks in QuickBooks.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.514.0012

lharris@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

LAUREN HARRIS + SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Lauren Harris is a Senior Accountant in the Client Accounting Services department at Lutz with over four years of related experience. She specializes in providing payroll tax reporting and compliance, software training and support, and outsourced accounting assistance to small businesses.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • QuickBooks Training & Support
  • Outsourced Accounting
  • Payroll Tax Reporting and Compliance
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Finance and Accounting, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Midwest YouCan Foundation, Treasurer

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Five Ways Coronavirus Impacts Your 2020 Personal Taxes

Five Ways Coronavirus Impacts Your 2020 Personal Taxes

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

FIVE WAYS CORONAVIRUS IMPACTS YOUR 2020 PERSONAL TAXES

five ways coronavirus impacts your 2020 personal taxes

daniel sweeney, tax manager

 

Congress passed a variety of tax-relief measures throughout 2020 because of the Coronavirus pandemic. Even income taxes did not escape the impact of COVID-19. Here are five ways that the Coronavirus will affect your 2020 taxes.

 

1. Net Operating Losses for 2020. 

If 2020 was not the year for your business, there is a silver lining. 2020 is the last year to take advantage of preferential rules for net operating losses. The “normal” rules would force taxpayers to take their business’s net operating loss to a future year and potentially subject the loss carryforward to an 80% of taxable income limitation. As of right now, 2021 will reimpose the normal rules. For 2020, the net operating loss can be carried back 5-years with no 80% of taxable income limitation. The carryback of the loss would hopefully result in a tax refund when carried back to a year that had taxable income.

The $250,000 (single) or $500,000 (married) limitation on excess business losses has also been removed.  Like the changes to net operating losses, the “normal” limitations are set to reapply for the 2021 tax year.  If business in 2020 was not great, there is the possibility for some relief that would not normally be available.

 

2. Estimated Tax Payments and IRS backlog

In a normal year, estimated tax payments would have been due April 15th, June 15th, September 15th, and January 15th (of the following year). IRS Notice 2020-23 postponed the due date for 2020 estimated tax payments for the first quarter and the second quarter of 2020 until July 15th, 2020. The IRS has not been great about keeping track of payments they received in 2020. Taxpayers may receive more notices than usual about their 2020 estimated tax payments, even if the payments were made on time.

 

3. Charitable Deduction for Non-Itemizers

After 2017’s tax reform (the beloved Tax Cuts and Jobs Act), the vast majority of taxpayers no longer itemize their deductions. Itemized deductions include the deduction for contributions made to a qualifying charity. As such, most taxpayers no longer receive a tax benefit for their charitable contributions. The story slightly changes for 2020.

Now taxpayers can take a charitable deduction for up to $300 (single) or $600 (married) even if they do not itemize their deductions. The contributions must be cash/check, and a receipt still needs to be received. While not a huge tax-break, it is an additional deduction available for 2020 and 2021.

 

4. No Required Minimum Distributions from your IRA.

For those over age 70½ or are the beneficiaries of an inherited IRA, the requisite to make your required minimum distribution for 2020 was waived. If required minimum distributions were made out from the account, you had until August 31st, 2020, to put the distribution back into the account.

However, even if the funds were placed back into the account, taxes may still have been withheld. The portion related to the taxes withheld would normally not be placed back into the account. Fortunately, those withheld taxes can still be claimed on your 2020 tax return.

For 2021, required minimum distributions are set to resume. It is worth following up on what happened to your required minimum distribution, even if it was placed back into your account.

 

5. Stimulus Payments (Economic Impact Payments)

Throughout the summer of 2020, the Treasury Department made direct payments of up to $1,200 per taxpayer and $500 qualifying child. The Treasury made additional $600 payments at the end of December 2020 and beginning of January 2021. Unfortunately, College students claimed as a dependent lost out. A qualifying child needs to be under age 17 for the parent to receive a payment.

These payments were really structured as an advance payment of a tax credit calculated on your 2020 tax return. The tax credit will be calculated based on your 2020 income. However, the payment you received was likely based off your 2019 or 2018 income.

The good news is that if the stimulus payment you received is higher than the tax credit on your 2020 tax return, you do not have to pay anything back. The better news is that if the calculated tax credit on your tax return is higher than your stimulus payment, then you will get an additional tax credit on your 2020 tax return.

The stimulus payment was partially reduced for taxpayers with adjusted gross income (AGI) over $75,000 (single) or $150,000 (married) for 2018 or 2019. If 2020’s AGI is lower, you may receive an additional tax credit if you did not receive the full stimulus payment amounts.

 

No Change –The Due Date

At the moment, the IRS is not planning to change any of the due dates for the 2020 tax filing season. For 2019 tax returns, the due date was pushed back to July 15th. For 2020 tax returns, the due date is still April 15, 2021, for personal income tax returns, along with an April 15th deadline for first quarter estimated tax payments. The IRS is still multiple months behind on processing 2019 tax returns but has said that they expect to be ready to go for 2020 returns. We will keep up-to-date and inform you if there are any changes. If you have any questions, please contact us.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.463.8988

dsweeney@lutz.us

747 N BURLINGTON AVE

SUITE 401

PO BOX 1317

HASTINGS, NE 68902

DANIEL SWEENEY + TAX MANAGER

Daniel Sweeney is a Tax Manager at Lutz that focuses on a number of areas including tax preparation and planning for individuals, partnerships, and corporations. His experience also includes international tax and tax research.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska State Bar Association, Member
  • Hastings Young Professionals, Member
  • Nebraska State Bar
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Political Science, American University, Washington, D.C.
  • JD, University of Nebraska Lincoln College of Law, Lincoln, NE
  • LLM Tax, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Chicago, IL
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Hastings College Adjunct Professor of Federal Income Tax

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Paycheck Protection Program Updates

Paycheck Protection Program Updates

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM UPDATES

paycheck protection program updates

The Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA) passed at the end of December 2020 contained language reopening the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) for First Draw Loans and creating the PPP for Second Draw Loans. The below listing presents a summary of the major points of each program.

PPP First Draw (PPP1):

  • Opened back up for first-time borrowers
  • Flexible covered period allowed (time period between 8 and 24 weeks)
  • One page forgiveness application for PPP loans <$150K (has not been released)
  • Payroll expanded to include company paid disability, vision and dental
  • EIDL Advance/Grant not deducted from forgiveness amount
  • Additional eligible uses of loan proceeds include worker protection costs related to COVID-19, uninsured property damage costs caused by looting or vandalism during 2020, and certain supplier costs and expenses for operations

PPP Second Draw (PPP2):

General Information

  • Available until March 31, 2021
  • 5-year forgivable loan @ 1%
  • Flexible covered period allowed (time period between 8 and 24 weeks)

Eligibility Criteria

  • PPP1 funds must be spent by PPP2 disbursement date
  • For NAICS #72 businesses (such as hotels and restaurants) with multiple locations, the borrower must have less than 300 employees per physical location
    • affiliation rules still apply, but it appears that the alternative size standards and net income/book value test no longer apply)
    • For businesses with multiple locations, not more than 300 employees per physical location
  • Borrower must show a 25% “gross receipts” reduction in any 2020 calendar quarter, compared to the same quarter in 2019
    • Borrower can also compare full year 2020 vs. 2019 for 25% “gross receipts” reduction
    • Comparison periods will differ for borrowers who were not in operation for entire 2019 year
    • “Gross receipts” include all revenue in whatever form received or accrued (in accordance with the entity’s accounting method) from whatever source, including from the sales of products or services, interest, dividends, rents, royalties, fees, or commissions, reduced by returns and allowances
      • PPP1 forgiveness amount and EIDL is excluded from the “gross receipts” reduction test
      • No guidance has been released on Provider Relief Funds being includable as “gross receipts” during 2020
    • Method of accounting (cash or accrual) for “gross receipts” reduction test should follow method used on tax returns

Loan Amount

  • Maximum loan amount of $2 million
  • Loan amount equal to 2019 or 2020 average monthly payroll x 2.5 (or x 3.5 for NAICS code 72 such as restaurants and hotels)
  • Schedule F: Loan based on 2.5x average monthly gross income (max of $100K gross income)
    • If a borrower has employees: sum of (i) the difference between gross income and employee payroll costs of the borrower in 2019 or 2020, that is not more than $100,000 divided by 12, and (ii) the average total monthly payroll costs for the employees incurred or paid during the same year elected by the borrower x 2.5 (max loan amount of $2 million)
  • Schedule C: Based on 2.5x average monthly net self-employment income (not to exceed $100K)
  • Loan to a single corporate group cannot exceed $4 million
    • Majority owned, directly or indirectly, by a common parent

 PPP2 Documentation

  • No additional documentation to substantiate payroll costs will be required if:
    • Used calendar year 2019 payroll figures to determine PPP1 and PPP2 loans amounts, and
    • The lender is the same
  • For loans over $150,000, submit documentation on “gross receipts” decline such as:
    • Relevant tax forms, including annual tax forms, or if relevant tax forms are not available, quarterly financial statements or bank statements
  • For loans of $150,000 or less, documentation is not required to be submitted with the loan application but must be submitted on or before the date the borrower applies for loan forgiveness. However, we assume most lenders will require “gross receipts” documentation when applying for PP2 since the “gross receipts” comparison will need to be completed to determine eligibility

If you have any questions on your eligibility for PPP1, PPP2, or the forgiveness of either program, please reach out to:

Michael Greteman

mgreteman@lutz.us

(402) 514-0015

Justin Korth

jkorth@lutz.us

(402) 514-0007

Mark Otte

motte@lutz.us

(402) 827-2032

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Lutz adds Frei, Gaston and Stone to Omaha Office

Lutz adds Frei, Gaston and Stone to Omaha Office

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Will Frei
Annie Gaston
Jana Stone

Lutz adds frei, gaston and stone to omaha office

Lutz, a Nebraska-based business solutions firm, welcomes Will Frei, Annie Gaston, and Jana Stone to its Omaha office. 

Will Fei joins Lutz’s Accounting division as a Staff Accountant in the audit department. He is responsible for providing credibility to clients through financial reporting. In addition, he works to maintain a high level of objectivity and confidentiality in all areas for clients in a variety of industries. Frei graduated from Hastings College with a Bachelor’s degree in accounting.

Annie Gaston joins Lutz’s firm admin department as an Administrative Assistant. She is responsible for providing administrative support to the firm including continued education recordkeeping, tax return processing and other duties as assigned. Graduating from Midland University, Gaston received her Bachelor’s degree in arts management.

Jana Stone joins Lutz’s Talent division as a Talent Sourcer. She is responsible for interviewing and placing candidates for Lutz Talent clients. Jana focuses on the accounting, finance, office administration, and human resources industries. She received her Bachelor’s degree in communications and biblical studies from Grace University.

RECENT POSTS

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

8 Reasons QuickBooks is the Automated Accounting Software Your Business Needs

8 Reasons QuickBooks is the Automated Accounting Software Your Business Needs

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

8 REASONS QUICKBOOKS IS THE AUTOMATED ACCOUNTING SOFTWARE YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS

8 reasons quickbooks is the automated accounting software your business needs

jimmy burgess, senior accountant

 

If you’ve decided that it’s time to automate your company’s accounting procedures, you’ll find that there’s a lot of competition for your dollars. But there’s really no need to look beyond the market leader, QuickBooks. Millions of small businesses use it.

QuickBooks’ popularity isn’t the only reason you should consider it. If you look at the reasons it’s a household name, you’re likely to discover why it’s the first choice for so many. Here’s why it’s become the Microsoft Word of accounting software. QuickBooks:

1. Is time-tested.

The desktop version was introduced nearly 30 years ago.

2. Is multi-platform.

You can choose between a desktop version that you pay for upfront or an online version that is subscription-based.

3. Was designed by accountants for small businesses.

You don’t have to have a deep understanding of accounting to use it, since the complex bookkeeping goes on in the background.

4. Works like other software and websites.

If you’ve used other productivity applications, you will recognize the user interface and navigation conventions it follows.

5. Is generic enough that it can be used by a wide variety of small businesses.

While every business is unique, QuickBooks provides tools that allow any company to:

  • Keep track of customer, vendor, and product/service records.
  • Manage income and expenses.
  • Create and send sales and purchase forms like invoices and purchase orders.
  • Pay bills.
  • Run payroll.
  • Generate reports that give them instant overviews of their finances.

6. Can be tailored to meet more specific needs.

Both versions of QuickBooks are exceptionally customizable. If you need more tools in a specific area like inventory or billing or payroll, for example, you can choose from hundreds of integrated add-on solutions.

7. Helps you track down the smallest details.

When you need to find a specific transaction or customer email address or the payment status of an invoice, you can do so quickly and easily.

8. Minimizes duplicate data entry.

Once you’ve entered information once, like a customer’s address or the price of a product or service, QuickBooks remembers it, so you never have to type it in again. When you’re creating a sales receipt or invoice, for example, you can select the customer’s name and the item you’re selling from lists of records you’ve already created. QuickBooks fills in the blanks with information about pricing, sales tax, discounts, etc.

This automation:

  • Saves time and money.
  • Helps prevent errors.
  • Keeps your financial books consistent.

QuickBooks automates so much more of your tedious bookkeeping tasks. It can connect and download transactions from your financial institution. For example, it can remind you when invoices are due (or overdue), tell you when bills need to be paid, give you a heads up when it’s time to run payroll, and show you in an instant what your current profit or loss is, how many invoices are past due, or what the balance of each of your accounts is. If you’re ready to get started, contact us. We can help you set up QuickBooks to fit your business.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.514.0016

jburgess@lutz.us

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JIMMY BURGESS + SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

Jimmy Burgess is a Senior Accountant at Lutz with over four years of relevant experience. His primary focus is to provide outsourced accounting to clients with a focus on QuickBooks, tax and payroll compliance, small business consulting, as well as software implementation training.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Outsourced Accounting Services
  • QuickBooks
  • Tax & Payroll Compliance
  • Small Business Consulting
  • Software Implementation & Training
  • Construction Industry
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Business Administration and Accounting, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Youth Sports Coach, Volunteer
QUICKBOOKS PROADVISOR CERTIFICATIONS

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

R&D Credits in the Agriculture Industry

R&D Credits in the Agriculture Industry

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

R&D CREDITS IN THE AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY

r&d credits in the agriculture industry

adam jacobitz, tax & audit shareholder

 

America’s agricultural sector has been facing challenges in workforce availability, climate, technology, among many other issues. With the world population expected to hit 9 billion by the year 2050, agriculture businesses will need to ramp up production by up to 70% to accommodate the growing population.

Farms across the U.S are incorporating new and innovative techniques to deal with issues of pesticides, fertilizers, contamination, spoiled produce, harvesting, and diminishing labor force. Thankfully, federal tax credits are available for corporations, individuals, and businesses undertaking research and development efforts to alleviate the current farming and produce challenges while enhancing better yields.

The Research & Development Tax Credit

Research & Development Tax Credits are a government incentive aimed at helping businesses by encouraging and rewarding innovation. The federal Research and Development (R&D) Tax Credit act was enacted in 1981 and allows a credit of up to 13% of eligible spending for new or improved processes and products. R&D tax credits are available to companies engaged in research and development activity, regardless of their size, albeit subject to eligibility.

R&D Eligibility Requirements

Your research/project can qualify for tax credits if it meets the following criteria:

  • Improved or new products, processes, or software– Your research qualifies if it relates to a new or enhanced performance, function, or quality of an agricultural component (i.e., process, product, formula, software, or technique).
  • Technological in nature- This is to say that the activity(s) to be undertaken must be primarily technical. As such, the activity must be based on principles of science such as biology, computer science, or engineering.
  • Eliminates uncertainties- The activity must also tackle uncertainties in the methodology, capabilities, or development process of the business component.
  • Process of experimentation- For the research to qualify for the R&D tax credit, the activity must also entail evaluation and experimentation of one or more options through development, refinement, and testing of different alternatives.

Qualified costs include costs of supplies, testing, or patents, research expenses, and employee wages.

Are You Missing Out?

The agricultural sector is rife with activities that are eligible for the R&D tax credit. Check out a few brief examples of the R&D tax credit for agriculture to help you determine your eligibility.

Common Examples of R&D Tax Credits for Agriculture

1. Development of New or Enhanced Storage Techniques

This may entail developing packaging to control temperature and moisture or even a structural design to prevent the produce/product from degradation, contamination, molding, fermentation, or grain clumping.

2. Development of New or Improved Conveyance Chains/Systems

As a product is moved through production, there can be changes to the conveyance design or process to reduce waste/material loss, improve speed, or enhance the process’s dependability. Transport designs such as refrigeration or trucking may also qualify.

3. Development of New or Improved Products or Processes to Maximize Yield

As you seek to improve the growth or returns on livestock or crops, there is a wide range of activities that may qualify here. These include:

  • Testing of new or improved techniques of planting and harvesting
  • Testing of new or improved fertilizers or chemical additives
  • Testing of new or enhanced feeding techniques and feeds to enhance livestock growth and health
  • Examining new soil blends including nutrient density, mineral content, and pH 
  • Evaluation of new products and methods for preventing disease or pest infestation

4. Development of new or improved software

This may entail developing software meant to facilitate land tracking, produce or material monitoring, and crop selection based on soil characteristics.

5. Development of New or Improved Irrigation Technologies

If you are creating a mechanical, electrical system, or software to automate or streamline an irrigation process, your project is may be eligible for R&D tax credits.

6. Development of New or Improved Techniques or Equipment to Minimize Environmental Impact

This involves equipment or techniques to enhance compliance with evolving environmental legislation or, generally, any other interventions in agriculture meant to promote environmental conservation.

Common Exclusionary Items

It is worth noting that the following items are usually not eligible for R&D tax credits:

  1. Equipment investment subject to depreciation
  2. Small adjustments to livestock diet or feed components
  3. Adapting an existing product to a customer’s specifications
  4. Administrative or functional operations that do not contribute or amount to agricultural innovation

How We Can Help

Many agricultural corporations and businesses are still unaware that the government is offering generous R&D incentives or believe that such incentives do not apply to the agricultural sector. Even those aware may fail to grasp the full extent of R&D tax credits that they are entitled to. Have questions? Contact us today to learn more about these unique tax credits and how they might benefit you.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.463.8984

ajacobitz@lutz.us

ADAM JACOBITZ + TAX & AUDIT SHAREHOLDER

Adam Jacobitz is a Tax & Audit Shareholder at Lutz with over 14 years of tax and audit experience. He specializes in individual and business income taxation, housing industry audits, and consulting services.

AREAS OF FOCUS

 

AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Affordable Housing Association of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • National Association of Housing & Redevelopment Officials - NE Chapter, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Accounting & Finance with a Minor in Economics, Doane College, Crete, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Faith Lutheran Church, Treasurer
  • Leadership Hastings, Past Board Member and Treasurer
  • Hastings Symphony Orchestra, Past Board Member and Treasurer
  • Hastings Community Foundation, Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850