Dirty Data? 6 Ways to Cleanse a Database

Dirty Data? 6 Ways to Cleanse a Database

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

DIRTY DATA

dirty data? 6 ways to cleanse a database

tony desantis, data analytics manager

 

Organizations can only make truly effective strategic decisions when the data they review is dependably accurate. This level of accuracy is challenging to obtain and maintain, as data integrity tends to degrade over time. Inaccuracies tend to creep in through lack of controls within a system or process, staff error or inaccurate changes made by users, customers, etc. Businesses must be proactive to ensure they do everything possible to keep their database information clean and accurate.

What is Dirty Data?  

Dirty data is a name given to a specific type of information held in a database. It is data that may have spelling or punctuation errors. It could also be outdated, incomplete, or missing altogether. Bad data could be duplicate or inconsistent data, such as when the name of a state is spelled out vs. abbreviated in others.

How Dirty Data Causes Issues

Once you understand what comprises dirty data, it becomes clear how it can cause major issues for firms (most of whom heavily rely on this information for their strategic decision-making). With bad data, even minor reports may be significantly inaccurate, data security and privacy issues can arise, it becomes more difficult to aggregate information, and larger accounting and financial reports could contain significant inaccuracies.  

How Accurate is Your Data?

If your firm seems to be struggling with data issues, you are not alone. Many organizations face problems that arise from dirty data. Companies who struggle with nonexistent data, unreliable data, or data discrepancies (no single source of truth) may want to consider whether their database(s) no longer have a high level of accuracy.

Strategizing the Data Cleansing Process

After recognizing you have a problem with dirty data, the next step is to develop a data cleansing strategy. Some points to consider when organizing this initiative include:

  • Deciding how clean is “clean enough.”
  • Identifying what data is actually dirty and how it affects reporting and analytics strategies.
  • Identifying the cause(s) of dirty data.

Not every company will require the same level of data cleanliness. For example, some will be willing to accept street addresses that abbreviate words such as “Street” or “Drive.” Others will have more strict requirements, for example, changing all abbreviated street addresses to reflect their full description. 

Companies must pay particular attention to data that is incorporated into their reporting and analysis efforts. There may be some instances of bad data that does not negatively affect reporting and analytics enough to justify a stringent cleaning effort. In other cases, it may be “mission-critical” to thoroughly cleanse bad data, as well as employ methods to ensure the newly cleansed data maintains its accuracy for these areas.

Lastly, if data is important enough to go through the cleansing process, it must be determined how it became dirty in the first place. Any processes that allowed the insertion of bad data must be corrected. Generally, the most common underlying issue is inaccurate data entry. Other areas that may need to be addressed are whether there are multiple sources that capture the same data, how data is captured (e.g., free-form text fields, vs. drop-down lists and checkboxes), as well as other processes with “holes” that allowed the input of bad data.

6 Ways to Clean Data

Not every step in the list below will be necessary for every company that needs to cleanse its database. The methods a company decides to employ will depend on the type of data they are trying to scrub.

How to clean a database: 

  1. Leverage in-house skill sets to write programs or scripts to address bad data. Tools such as Python, R, and SQL can all be used to merge, update, and delete data.
  2. Employ automated programs to identify and merge duplicate fields, records, etc.
  3. Consider the value of purging a database of specific records at a pre-determined time. This can help clean the remaining data and reduce the scope of data to be evaluated.
  4. Update outdated records and fields with newer data and determine whether it is necessary to retain old data. If you are deleting old information, create a change log or history file to store the outdated data.
  5. Enrich missing data by employing easily accessible in-house data. Some firms may want to consider employing a data service that already has the needed data, to allow for quicker updates.
  6. Standardize data by developing naming convention standards for data sources across the board. Also, determine which fields should be standardized, then employ tools that automatically look for opportunities to standardize fields (e.g., St vs. St. vs. Street). Once clean data is in place, ensure the input processes for the newly cleansed fields will only allow for the insertion of data in a specified format. 

In summary, having accurate data to draw from when making business decisions is vital. By diligently addressing all the issues associated with dirty data, companies will greatly improve the accuracy of their reporting and analysis efforts, both now and in the future.  

If you would like more information on how to clean and maintain the integrity of your organization’s data, please contact us. You can also read related articles on our blog.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tony DeSantis

402.496.8800

tdesantis@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

TONY DESANTIS + DATA ANALYTICS MANAGER

Tony DeSantis is a Data Analytics Manager at Lutz with over 20 years of experience. He is responsible for interpreting and analyzing data, as well as designing report visuals in support of client engagements. In addition, he specializes in data management and the application of artificial intelligence to simplify business processes.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Data Analytics
  • Data Visualization
  • Data Management
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Forensic Analytics
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Finance and Operations, Minor in Management Information Systems, University of Delaware, Newark, DE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Junior Achievement, Volunteer
  • Gilda's Club Chicago, Past Board Member

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Does My Business Need a Physical Security Assessment?

Does My Business Need a Physical Security Assessment?

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

DOES MY BUSINESS NEED A PHYSICAL SECURITY ASSESSMENT?

does my business need a physical security assessment?

ROBERT KEENAN, CHEIF information & RISK OFFICER

 

Every business owner is responsible for the physical security of the property, even if you are only renting. This relates to liability, loss prevention, and employee protection; all rolled into one. The safety of your building is determined by its structure, accessibility, maintenance, and security features. From someone slipping on the stairs to theft in the parking lot, your responsibility extends to a clear legal definition:

  1. Could you have reasonably foreseen the risk?
  2. What did the business owner do to reduce or prevent the risk?

If your property safety is incomplete or a recent incident has highlighted a security gap, a physical safety assessment is the first step to informed improvements. Consulting with an expert can ensure you are doing everything possible to keep the property and people safe.

 

What is a Physical Security Assessment?

A physical security assessment is a full review of your property’s safety against intruders, bad weather, and injury. It looks for any gaps in your property security so you can make improvements. In many ways, the security assessment is like an inspection, giving answers and recommending solutions without any obligation to decide right away.

Physical security starts at the physical level and extends upward to the electric control and monitoring systems. The electronic and security control centers are assessed for performance and efficiency. If weaknesses or gaps are identified, recommendations are offered to remedy the issues. A physical security assessment can protect you from both crime and liability cases because the potential risk on-premises has been minimized.

 

What Does it Cover or Evaluate?

Physical security assessments review the areas that need protection, and what measures are currently in place to protect them. The assessment will:

  • Check the physical security of your commercial property (inside and outside).
  • Review your policies and procedures to ensure you are in compliance and protected from liability.
  • Assess the security of your files and the proficiency to improve the performance of security measures.

 

Who Needs a Physical Risk Assessment?

Every business should have one completed at least every 12-18 months. From retail stores, schools, manufacturers, restaurants, and more, every business or organization can benefit from a physical risk assessment. Each property has assets and people to protect and should take the appropriate measures to safeguard them.

 

How Does a Physical Security Assessment Help My Business? What are the Benefits?

Every property should be kept safe. The items in your building should be protected from theft, and the people in your building should be safe from crime or an accident. Your premises should include clear paths, suitable lighting, and security surveillance. If you have inventory, it should be tightly protected. Your machinery should be under lock when put away for the night, and all on-site files should be secured.

When you have a physical security assessment, you gain insights into how your property is currently protected and how it could be safer. You hold the power to decide how to secure your property, starting with a complete overview of your security as it stands and the best ways to enhance it. 

 

How is a Physical Security Assessment Conducted?

A physical security expert will assess:

  • Physical security structures
  • Identification and access
  • Security procedures and personnel
  • History of crime and loss
  • Architectural security

 

How Do I Choose the Right Provider to Conduct the Assessment?

A physical security assessment can help you protect your property and people. This is critical for every organization to reduce risk and liability. Seek the help of a local provider that you can trust. Contact us today to start discussing your property’s physical security assessment needs. You can also click here to read more articles related to this topic.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.763.2973

rkeenan@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

ROBERT KEENAN + CHIEF INFORMATION & RISK OFFICER

Robert Keenan is the Chief Information & Risk Officer at Lutz with over 20 years of compliance and operational risk experience. He focuses on risk management, compliance, and security for the firm, and will partner with the operations team to drive process improvement and operational efficiencies for Lutz.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Risk Management & Compliance
  • Operations
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners
  • Society of Compliance and Ethics Professionals
  • National Society of Compliance Professionals
  • Certified Fraud Examiner
  • Certified Compliance and Ethics Professional
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Finance, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
  • MPA, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners - Heartland Chapter, Past Board Member

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Lutz adds Zach Koester and Lauren Meyers

Lutz adds Zach Koester and Lauren Meyers

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Zach Koester
Lauren Meyers

Lutz adds zach koester and lauren meyers

Lutz, a Nebraska-based business solutions firm, welcomes Zach Koester and Lauren Meyers to its Omaha office.

Koester joins Lutz M&A as a Financial Analyst. He specializes in merger and acquisition advisory services and business valuation. Koester received his Bachelor’s degree in banking and financial markets, business finance, and investment SCI & portfolio management from the University of Nebraska-Omaha.

Lauren joins the Firm as a Data Analyst. Her primary responsibilities include exploring, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data to support customer needs. In addition, she will consult with Data Analytics clients to help them better leverage their data and gain actionable insights through reporting and analytics. Graduating from Rockhurst University, Meyers received her Master’s degree in business administration and business intelligence and analytics.

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Visualize Key Data Through Dashboards

Visualize Key Data Through Dashboards

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

VISUALIZE KEY DATA THROUGH DASHBOARDS

Visualize Key Data Through Dashboards

Steve Schaffer, operations manager

 

Data tells a story. It can reveal how well a business is performing and highlight aspects that need immediate attention. You can visualize a dynamic snapshot of a number of key data points through dashboards, summarizing the critical information business leaders require to make the most effective decisions. Here are six steps to help you get started with creating informative dashboards.

 

1.  Keep it Simple

The reason for creating a dashboard is to be able to visualize key data points easily. Achieving this can be difficult if the dashboard contains an excessive number of data points. To prevent information overload, it is best to select 3-5 key performance indicators (KPIs) that a dashboard user will require on any one page.

Keep in mind, the KPIs a viewer is interested in will vary depending on the department or staff member requesting the dashboard. The main takeaway is to create a dashboard that is focused and concise rather than generic.

 

2.  Strategize with an Outline  

Developing a valuable dashboard will require the creator to design a strategy. A useful dashboard will allow viewers to extract meaningful data about the objective at hand while remaining within the constraints of a limited landscape. Creating an outline will involve determining not only which KPIs are most useful but also their placement. Questions to consider are:

  • What are the most important data points?
  • How much detail will be required of them?
  • On which page will a KPI be the most useful?
  • Which KPIs must be placed nearby each other to synergize their use?

When necessary, use slicers and filtering to organize and display the data, maximizing clarity and meaningfulness.

 

3.  Select the Right Visual  

It is important to select visuals that best highlight the primary purpose of a set of data. Consider each objective you want to fulfill, then evaluate the different types of visuals available. For example, in some cases, a pie chart may be more insightful than a bar graph. If you are unsure which format is suitable for your data, test a few options to see which presents the best layout.

 

4.  Take Advantage of Color

There is a reason why the most useful visual presentations of data involve the use of multiple colors. Using color to highlight critical information naturally draws the eye to desired points on a page. The key is to be consistent when using color cues (especially over multiple visualizations) without using so much color as to overwhelm the viewer.

 

5.  Accuracy is Everything  

Summarizing data allows viewers to get a concise look without getting bogged down in details that tend to obscure key takeaways. However, removing details that may point out discrepancies within the data increases the potential for displaying inaccurate data points.

A good rule to remember is that 80% of data analytics projects should focus on collecting and modeling data to ensure accuracy. The other 20% should be spent on building the visual portion of the dashboard. To ensure accuracy remains at the forefront of every dashboard project, it is best to always prioritize accuracy and simplicity rather than filling a dashboard with impressive-looking charts where accuracy may be questionable.

 

6.  Dynamic Feedback and Automation

One of the great benefits of setting up a dashboard is configuring it to provide dynamic feedback to interested parties rather than simply presenting a static snapshot of data. Imagine a data tool that, unlike a static report, is actively working behind the scenes to keep business leaders and decision-makers updated on critical changes.

Dashboards can also be set up to send automatic notifications to key viewers when granular data changes, which can affect KPIs. They can also be configured to notify interested parties when thresholds are breached, or data violates certain pre-configured rules. By providing dynamic summarized updates, decision-makers are much more likely to enact a timely and appropriate response.

 

Summary

Dashboards can help companies better visualize their performance. With a few simple steps, you can begin sharing meaningful insights. If you would like to learn more about dashboards or data analytics, click here. You can also contact us if you have any questions. For more information on related topics, check out our blog.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.492.2125

sschaffer@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

115 CANOPY STREET

SUITE 200

LINCOLN, NE 68508

STEVE SCHAFFER + OPERATIONS MANAGER

Steve Schaffer is an Operations Manager at Lutz with over eight years of relevant experience. He is responsible for assisting the Chief Operating Officer in leading internal operations, gathering and analyzing firm data, as well as consulting with management on internal business plans.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Internal Operations
  • Data Analysis
  • Financial Reporting
  • Process and Technology Efficiency Consulting
  • Internal Business Plans
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in History, Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA
  • MBA, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • NextGen Lincoln, Board Member
  • Lincoln Leadership Fellow 2020-21
  • Nebraska Make-A-Wish, Young Leaders Council
  • Lincoln Young Professionals Group, Member
  • Ronald McDonald House, Volunteer

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20 Risk Management Terms Explained

20 Risk Management Terms Explained

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

20 RISK MANAGEMENT TERMS EXPLAINED

20 Risk Management Terms Explained

Robert keenan, chief information & risk officer

 

All organizations face risks that could harm to their reputation, potentially cost them money, or worse, their future. Therefore, risk management needs to be a central part of every business. Essentially, risk management keeps the current and potential risks forefront in owners/CEOs/Executives’ mind. A risk management plan enables you to strategize tactics to help avoid potential threats, diminish their impact, and advance your company’s resilience. This blog will take a deep dive into the most common terms used during the risk management process to help you better understand the subject. 

 

1. Enterprise Risk Management (ERM)/ Business Continuity plan (BCP)/ Contingency Planning (CP)

ERM is the process of detecting and procedurally addressing potential business risks. ERM’s objective is to develop an all-inclusive portfolio view of all the risks (both negative and positive) in a top-down list depending on the significance of the impact.

Contingency planning acts as a fallback plan for high exposure risk capable of grounding all the business operations. For example, what happens when the backup hard disk gets corrupted in a ransomware or malware attack on the corporate data? This process establishes policies, strategies, methods, and actions to be taken in the event of a risk. The objective is to lessen as much as possible impacts by outlining how to cope during interruption of service. A BCP plan highlights the specific procedure to be taken in the event of a contingency.

2. Disaster recovery planning

Designing how the business should continue operations or services in the event of a calamity (ex. Flood, tornado or power outage) that disorders the normal flow of the activities or services.

3. Compliance risk profile

A compilation of risks emanating from non-adherence to a set of compliance practices such as regulations, rules, laws, policies, or ethical standards in the industry.

4. Control Assessment

Identifying, reviewing, and analyzing the current and missing controls to ascertain whether they are enough or are working efficiently. This is essential because as the business environment and nature of operations change, its risk profile also changes.

5. Emergent/emerging risk

These are previously poorly estimated or understood risks, but they are projected to grow significantly due to internal or external changes. The differentiating factor is that emergent threats lack a track record essential in estimating the likelihoods and likely losses.

6. Incident

One or several occurrences, or even a non-occurrence. Also known as an event, it can also denote a change in settings or circumstances. You expect all incidents to have causes and repercussions. 

7. Inherent risk or impact

The risk springing from inherent probability. i.e., an inherent risk is that which can strike when no controls are in place or the current extenuating measures fail.

Note: A quantified measure in the monetary value of the risk if it crystalized and there were no mitigation measures in place to control the impact.

8. Key Risk Indicators (KRIs)

Part of critical indicators responsible for monitoring the potential issues in an organization. Specifically, KRIs refer to vital indicators that predict unfriendly incidents that poorly impact the company, achieved by tracking changes in risk exposure levels.

9. Mitigation

Necessary steps, controls, measures, procedures, or tools deployed to reduce the risk probability and/or reduce the impact of such possible threats.

10. Operation Risk

The risk stemming from the company’s business processes or failure/inadequacy in internal processes, systems, and other entities.

11. Reputation Risk

Current or future risks to the business coming from negative public reviews, sentiments, or perceptions.

12. Residual impact

The impact that occurs when a risk materializes even after applying all the necessary controls, monitoring, and guarantee processes.

13. Residual risk

A risk that remains after you have considered the existing control environment and applied the controls around it.

14. Risk analysis

Process of understanding the nature, source, and causes of a risk after its identification and then studying the impacts and existing controls.

15. Risk attitude

The general approach an organization takes in assessing and addressing risks. Corporate’s risk attitude is vital in telling risk tolerance levels and if the mitigating actions are implemented on time.

16. Risk evaluation

The method used in comparing risk analysis results to determine if a particular likelihood of risk is within acceptable levels.

17. Risk identification

Process of finding, recognizing, and describing risks to quantify possible areas that can affect achieving the set objectives. This process uses historical data, theoretical analysis, opinions, professional advice, and stakeholder input to identify the underlying risks fully.

18. Risk management

Complete set of activities and procedures that direct an organization’s operations and how it controls the various risks that can negatively impact its objectives. It includes risk management principles, frameworks, and processes.

19. Risk mitigation

Efforts taken to either reduce the likelihood or impact of a risk.

20. Vulnerability

The organization’s susceptibility to risk incidents depending on readiness, agility, and adaptability.

 

Contact us today to learn more about how you can implement an effective risk management plan in your business. You can also read more about our risk assessment offering here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.763.2973

rkeenan@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

ROBERT KEENAN + CHIEF INFORMATION & RISK OFFICER

Robert Keenan is the Chief Information & Risk Officer at Lutz with over 20 years of compliance and operational risk experience. He focuses on risk management, compliance, and security for the firm, and will partner with the operations team to drive process improvement and operational efficiencies for Lutz.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Risk Management & Compliance
  • Operations
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners
  • Society of Compliance and Ethics Professionals
  • National Society of Compliance Professionals
  • Certified Fraud Examiner
  • Certified Compliance and Ethics Professional
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Finance, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
  • MPA, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners - Heartland Chapter, Past Board Member

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What is a Comprehensive Risk Assessment? Does My Company Need One?

What is a Comprehensive Risk Assessment? Does My Company Need One?

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

WHAT IS A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESSMENT

what is a comprehensive risk assessment? does my company need one?

robert keenan, chief information & risk officer

 

Starting, running, or managing a business requires you to take risks. However, it is important to establish a risk management plan for any business endeavor in order to be successful. Risk management helps companies prepare for unanticipated future occurrences. To start managing your risk, you will need to conduct a comprehensive risk assessment.

 

What is a Comprehensive Risk Assessment?

A risk assessment is an organized method of identifying possible risks involved while carrying out a particular activity. Therefore, a comprehensive risk assessment goes one step further by discovering the risks and then categorizing them into three major classes: high, medium, or low risk.

The assessment provides an all-inclusive report detailing risks your business is currently or could potentially face. After discovery, each risk is then evaluated independently to determine the likelihood of them happening and rating each accordingly ordered from high to low.

Finally, the efforts required to remedy are indicated according to the ease of doing so (usually from easy to challenging). Quick and straightforward procedures (requiring, for example, less budget or resources) are implemented first, closely followed by medium-rated, and finally, the more difficult ones. 

 

What Does a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Cover?

1. Compliance and Operational Risk Review

Businesses across different industries must comply with various regulations and compliance requirements. Additionally, many firms and organizations continue to experience rising threats of non-financial risks, which include technology failures and operational mistakes. Thus, it is vital to conduct a review to ascertain that you are not only adhering to the laws governing the operations of your business but are also upholding operational risks at a manageable level.

Failing to conduct a compliance and operational risk assessment may lead corporate to losses, expensive litigation or fines, remediation costs from non-adherence to compliance, employee safety issues, or damage to the business’s reputation. The review encompasses a complete assessment of everything that touches compliance, operations, organizational structure resources, location, training, and policy & procedures.

2. Physical Security Assessment

This form of assessment can answer most of your questions as a business owner or executive. What are the biggest risks to my physical structure and my most valuable asset, my employees? Where is the business most susceptible?

A physical security assessment refers to an evaluation performed on the assets to be protected and the best strategies to employ outstanding protection measures. The review helps you to fix:

  •  Major threats facing your people and property.
  • Loopholes or weak points you may have disregarded previously.
  • Priority on how to tackle each item suitably.

The output of the security assessment highlights the following areas and give corresponding recommendations on what to do in each:

  • Physical restrictions or access control of the assets.
  • Reviews the security of the staff members when they are in your physical buildings/locations.
  • Establishes an emergency communication strategy.
  • Ensures there is a rapid response notification system in place.

3. Technology Assessment

Today, businesses rely on technology for almost all business functions. From email to document storage, inventory, and other day-to-day tasks, your business most likely operates online in one way or another. What would happen if your technology failed? Does your company have an efficient disaster & recovery plan? How effective are your existing data security measures?

Cybersecurity threats continue to rise as technology advances and attacks become more sophisticated. A high-level cybersecurity assessment is designed to identify the risks to one of the most vital corporate assets, your data. This review seeks to determine whether your business is well-prepared to frustrate attempts by cybercriminals to gain illegal or unauthorized access to your business data and networks. It also determines whether you have conducted security awareness training (SAT) and implemented advanced endpoint protection of your system.

4. Fraud Risk Assessment

The last thing you would want to ignore in business is fraud and potential fraudulent deals. A fraud assessment enables you to identify possible areas and gaps in your current controls that pose a risk to your organization. Basically, a fraud review reveals unknown dangers, especially when there are changes in internal processes and controls, organizational structure, or segregation of duties among various personnel. The fraud assessment will review the appropriate diligence procedures, employee threats, ineffective or non-existing controls, and protection and implementation plans.

 

Does Your Company Need a Comprehensive Risk Assessment?

Before you can decide whether requesting a comprehensive risk assessment is right for your business, you should ask yourself the following questions:

1. Do I have a feeling that I am missing something? 

If you feel this way, an assessment can help relieve and assure you if what you currently have in place is enough or if changes or improvements need to be made. For instance, many businesses were unprepared for the COVID-19 pandemic that hit the world in 2020. 2021 still holds many uncertainties – have you thought about and prepared for everything?

2. Do you have policies/protocol(s) in place? Are they enough?

If your response is no or you are unsure, you need a risk assessment to help put the necessary policies or protocols in place to remain safe and compliant. If you responded yes, a risk assessment would still help by reviewing your policies to ensure they are practical and obliging. This is because policies often change, so you need to assess them regularly.

3. Do you currently or did you recently have an issue?

A risk assessment can help to develop a plan to mitigate any identified risks exclusively.

4. What is the fallout and damage control?

A comprehensive risk assessment will help you identify what damage could be caused by each potential risk and help you prepare a strategic plan to mitigate such events.

5. Do you have an internal employee that monitors your processes and procedures?

When a new process is added or significant changes are made to your operations, a risk assessment should be conducted to ensure you capture any new potential threats or unplanned outcomes/consequences to remain prepared and compliant.

Conclusively, a comprehensive risk assessment will help you understand all the threats that could create problems for you and your company and create a proper plan for mitigating and addressing these issues. If you have any questions, please contact us. You can also learn more about our risk assessment services here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.763.2973

rkeenan@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

ROBERT KEENAN + CHIEF INFORMATION & RISK OFFICER

Robert Keenan is the Chief Information & Risk Officer at Lutz with over 20 years of compliance and operational risk experience. He focuses on risk management, compliance, and security for the firm, and will partner with the operations team to drive process improvement and operational efficiencies for Lutz.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Risk Management & Compliance
  • Operations
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners
  • Society of Compliance and Ethics Professionals
  • National Society of Compliance Professionals
  • Certified Fraud Examiner
  • Certified Compliance and Ethics Professional
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Finance, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
  • MPA, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners - Heartland Chapter, Past Board Member

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We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

About UsOur Team | Events | Careers | Locations

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780Privacy Policy | All Content © Lutz & Company, PC 2021