5 Benefits of Using Gallup’s StrengthsFinder in Your Company

5 Benefits of Using Gallup’s StrengthsFinder in Your Company

INSIGHTS

5 Benefits of Using Gallup’s StrengthsFinder In Your Company

STEPHANIE HAND, HUMAN RESOURCES SHAREHOLDER

Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment can help you identify the strengths of the people working in your teams. Once you know what strengths are present, you can begin to make the most of your employees’ talents, maximizing productivity and increasing morale throughout your organization. Here are five key benefits of using Gallup’s StrengthsFinder in your company.

1. Place People in the Right Roles

Knowing where each person’s strengths lie can help you place them in roles that make the most of their talents. When employees are in roles that utilize their strengths, they are not only more productive and innovative, but they are also more likely to be engaged, energized, and happy at work. As a result, this can contribute significantly to higher employee engagement.

Use Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment during the recruitment process to help you find skilled candidates who will be a good fit for the role at hand and for your workplace culture. You can also use insight from the StrengthsFinder tool to move people into new roles within your organization if they are not thriving within their current positions.

2. Promote Positive Coaching

When you focus on people’s strengths, rather than their weaknesses, you create a positive workplace atmosphere. When giving feedback, you can talk about how each employee’s strengths relate to their performance, while also discussing ways to support them in areas that do not match their strengths. With strengths as a common language, you can begin to gain insight into the reasons that lie behind high and low performance, and take action to address them.

For example, when you see someone doing well in a particular area, strengths awareness can help you understand why they are so successful. Going forward, you can be sure to give them challenging and rewarding tasks that allow them to use their strengths.

3. Individualize Management

The “one size fits all” approach rarely works when managing large groups of people. Each person on the team will have their own individual responses to a particular management style, and what works to manage one person may backfire in the case of another. When managers understand the strengths of each person, they can tailor their management techniques to provide effective leadership to everyone on the team.

4. Facilitate Collaboration

When employees work together on a project, it is beneficial to have a variety of strengths present on the team. Understanding individual strengths means you can create teams that work well together.

It’s also helpful for team members to be aware of each other’s strengths so they can best assign roles and responsibilities. When team members know about each other’s talents, they can gain a better understanding of why certain people behave in certain ways. This can make it easier for them to work together to contribute to shared goals.

5. Improve Self-Awareness

On an individual level, having an awareness of one’s own strengths is highly beneficial. The more a person knows about themselves, the more easily they can direct their life to ensure they are successful. Taking the Gallup StrengthsFinder assessment could help someone in your company find success in both their personal and professional life. This reason alone should be enough to compel organizations, and the employees who call them home, to use StrengthsFinder as a valuable tool.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

shand@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

STEPHANIE HAND + HUMAN RESOURCES SHAREHOLDER

Steph Hand is a Human Resources Shareholder at Lutz with over 19 years of experience. She plays a key role in the people strategy for the firm including Lutz’s performance management process, employee relations and retention, talent management and benefits and compliance efforts.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Human Resources
  • Performance
  • Culture
  • Recruiting
  • Talent Management
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Human Resource Association of the Midlands, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management Certified Professional
  • Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Education, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
  • MA in Communication, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

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P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

GRAND ISLAND + NORTH 

403 Lexington Circle

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.384.9910

LINCOLN 

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Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND + SOUTH

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4 Tips for Successful Delegation

4 Tips for Successful Delegation

INSIGHTS

4 Tips for Successful Delegation

MARISA GIFT, TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

We all know delegation is inevitable as we grow in our leadership roles; however, it’s often easier said than done. The hesitancy to delegate can occur for many reasons, such as a fear of loss of control over the work, a lack of time to devote to necessary training, or not wanting to burden someone else with additional projects.

Although it may be easier to avoid delegating, it’s important to understand that each time we do, we inadvertently deny others a critical opportunity for growth. Delegation allows employees to learn new skills and gain exposure to a broader variety of work while also opening up our time to take on new challenges.

The next time you see an opportunity to delegate, follow these steps recommended by HRDQ to ensure your success:

1. Set clear expectations

In order to succeed in your delegation efforts, you should start with the end in mind. In other words, it’s important that the person who will be handling the project understands the “big picture” and what is expected of them. Be clear in the outcome you desire but keep in mind that it is the end result that matters, not the process that is used to get there. Focus on the “what” of the project rather than the detailed “how.”

2. Establish communication preferences

Be sure to establish your communication preferences in advance. For example, how often do you want to be updated on the status of the project? How do you prefer to receive these updates?

 Most importantly, work together to establish a reasonable deadline for the work. For bigger projects, it might be helpful to set some interim checkpoints to help keep the project moving along.

Finally, be sure that you communicate with yourself, too. Don’t rely on your memory! Write down the task, employee, milestones and deadline because the responsibility for the project ultimately stays with you.

 

3. Offer guidance/support

Of course, it’s also important that the person to which you are delegating understands that you are available for questions. Ask them how you can help support their work from the get-go. However, be wary of “reverse delegation” and taking the project back without knowing it. For example, if you respond “let me think about that” to a question, the ball is back in your court! Instead, ask the employee for their ideas and help them think through the problem.

 

4. Provide feedback

Since delegating work should provide growth opportunities for others, it is imperative that you review the employee’s work and offer timely feedback. If the project does not meet your expectations, do not redo the work yourself. Rather, take the time to offer the appropriate feedback and train the employee so they can avoid making the same mistake in the future. This final step is critical in ensuring that future delegation efforts go smoothly and end in success.

 

The next time you come across a project that can be delegated, take the extra time to offer the opportunity to someone else in your organization. It will likely be a worthwhile learning experience for both of you. As John C. Maxwell said, “If you want to do a few small things right, do them yourself. If you want to do great things and make a big impact, learn to delegate.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

mgift@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

MARISA GIFT + TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Marisa Gift is the Training and Development Manager at Lutz with over 15 years of experience. She helps shape the firm’s training and development strategy while also managing Lutz’s campus recruiting, orientation and mentoring programs.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Human Resources
  • Training
  • Leadership Development
  • Campus Recruiting
  • Performance
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association for Talent Development, Member
  • Human Resource Association of the Midlands, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Communication Studies & Politics, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
  • MA in Communication, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Publicity Committee
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Music Ministry
  • Drake University National Alumni Board of Directors, Past Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

GRAND ISLAND + NORTH 

403 Lexington Circle

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.384.9910

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND + SOUTH

2722 S Locust Street

Grand Island, NE 68801

P: 308.382.7850

Change Management: 5 Strategies to Embrace the Change

Change Management: 5 Strategies to Embrace the Change

INSIGHTS

Change Management: 5 Strategies to Embrace the Change

MARISA GIFT, TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

In the words of Sheryl Crow’s famous song, “A change will do you good.” Although it’s easy to say these words while singing along to a catchy tune, it’s much harder for some people to “live” change. In fact, research shows that 70% of change initiatives fail. Therefore, it’s important to consider how we as leaders can best help our team members embrace change and move forward toward a successful outcome.

We know that change in itself is not the problem. Rather, resistance to change can be a problem! It’s the same as when we fall off a bike. We typically will not break any bones from falling off a bike alone; however, it’s a different story when we put our wrist out to break the fall. Why is change so hard? Why do many people have the initial reaction to resist change?

Resisting change results from a human tendency to prefer “the known” and shy away from uncertainty. In other words, many of us are creatures of habit and prefer to stay that way. If you have some of these “creatures” on your team, here are a few tips for helping them through a change initiative:

1. Acknowledge the change:

Don’t sugarcoat the change. Be realistic and set expectations appropriately. Acknowledge that change is tough while also giving an explanation of the “bigger picture” and how the change will benefit the organization (and maybe even them!) in the long run.

2. Communicate, communicate, communicate:

Make sure people are “in the know” whenever possible. Avoid surprises and excess uncertainty whenever you can by laying out the process and timelines.

3. Ask for their two cents:

Whenever possible, ask for your team members’ input. Don’t interrupt or become defensive and be sure to follow up on the feedback you receive. At the very least, let people know their feelings and opinions have been heard by leaders who care. There’s nothing worse than asking for feedback and then ignoring it. This will damage your credibility and derail your change efforts.

4. Get them involved:

The more your team members can be part of the change, the more likely they will get “on board” and become advocates for the change they first resisted. Find roles for them that utilize their strengths and give them an opportunity to feel engaged in the change process and, more importantly, the organization as a whole.

5. Celebrate the small victories:

Change can be daunting because it often takes place over a long period of time with many steps along the way. Don’t forget to celebrate the small victories to continue the momentum and keep people excited.

 

We’ve all heard the cliché that the only constant is change. This statement has never been truer than in our world today. Give these tips a try the next time a change is revealed in your organization (or in your home!) and hopefully, your team members will join you in creating a successful outcome.  After all, a change will do us good!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

mgift@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

MARISA GIFT + TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Marisa Gift is the Training and Development Manager at Lutz with over 15 years of experience. She helps shape the firm’s training and development strategy while also managing Lutz’s campus recruiting, orientation and mentoring programs.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Human Resources
  • Training
  • Leadership Development
  • Campus Recruiting
  • Performance
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association for Talent Development, Member
  • Human Resource Association of the Midlands, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Communication Studies & Politics, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
  • MA in Communication, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Publicity Committee
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Music Ministry
  • Drake University National Alumni Board of Directors, Past Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

GRAND ISLAND + NORTH 

403 Lexington Circle

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.384.9910

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND + SOUTH

2722 S Locust Street

Grand Island, NE 68801

P: 308.382.7850

Personal Branding

Personal Branding

INSIGHTS

PERSONAL BRANDING

MARISA GIFT, TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Most people think of a colorful logo or a catchy slogan when they hear the word “branding.”  In fact, most people associate branding with organizations.  However, we mustn’t forget that people are brands, too.  Yes, YOU are a brand.  You should consciously create your personal brand because others will form an opinion of you regardless. You might as well control that opinion as much as possible!

As Tim Ferriss said, “Personal branding is about managing your name – even if you don’t own a business – in a world of misinformation, disinformation, and semi-permanent Google records.  Going on a date?  Chances are that your “blind” date has Googled your name.  Going to a job interview?  Ditto.”  If you haven’t thought about the personal brand you are portraying to the world lately, we encourage you to spend some time doing the following:

 

List your attributes

The goal is to find one or two things that separate you from your competition and make you unique.

 

Consider your personal values and vision

Take inventory of what matters most to you in life as well as your desired “future state” (i.e., where do you want to go?).

 

Be honest

It’s tempting to exaggerate but this is not the place to do that. You don’t want your brand to reflect something you are not.  There’s nothing fun about having to “pretend” rather than getting to be your real self.

 

Ask around

Ask five close friends or family members how they would describe you and check that their thoughts match the idea you have of yourself.

 

Surround yourself with good people

Research shows that we are the average of the five people we spend the most time with – do those people in your life align with who you are and who you want to be?

 

Be flexible

Your personal brand should be reviewed, and possibly revised, each year. In order to be effective, it needs to stay current.

 

If you follow these tips, you’ll be on your way to building a strong personal brand that reflects the real you. Bonus: the better you understand who you are and what you stand for, the better equipped you’ll be to ensure that your values are in line with the organization of your choice. As Tom Peters said, “To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called YOU.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

mgift@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

MARISA GIFT + TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Marisa Gift is the Training and Development Manager at Lutz with over 15 years of experience. She helps shape the firm’s training and development strategy while also managing Lutz’s campus recruiting, orientation and mentoring programs.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Human Resources
  • Training
  • Leadership Development
  • Campus Recruiting
  • Performance
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association for Talent Development, Member
  • Human Resource Association of the Midlands, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Communication Studies & Politics, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
  • MA in Communication, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Publicity Committee
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Music Ministry
  • Drake University National Alumni Board of Directors, Past Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

GRAND ISLAND + NORTH 

403 Lexington Circle

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.384.9910

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND + SOUTH

2722 S Locust Street

Grand Island, NE 68801

P: 308.382.7850

Understanding Today’s Job Seeker

Understanding Today’s Job Seeker

INSIGHTS

Understanding Today’s Jobseeker

JOSH BOESCH, LUTZ TALENT PARTNER

 

When it comes to recruiting new employees, how much do you really understand about the candidates you are trying to attract? Things have changed quite a bit since jobs were scarce– the post-recession millennial job seeker of today is far different than the job seeker of the past. And now that the job market has opened up, millennials (those born between 1980 and the mid-2000s) who are seeking a new position are being more selective in their next move. Attracting and retaining millennials will require employers to understand what attracts and motivates them to become valuable members of your team.

More than a Paycheck

While flexibility and time off are very important factors in a job seeker’s decision, most of all he or she seeks an opportunity to learn and grow. If you do not challenge a millennial, he or she will likely begin to search for opportunities outside of your organization.

It’s no longer just about the paycheck. Employees now leave for greater growth opportunity, better work-life balance, flex-time and location. In fact, the desire for work-life balance is no longer gender specific—men and women alike are viewing their lives more holistically, and they are gravitating toward those companies that offer greater balance. We are also seeing more millennials ask about these details during the interview process, showing their importance to them in a job.

They May Not Even Be Looking

A more interesting question might be who isn’t looking. According to JobVite’s 2016 Job Seeker Nation Study, 51% of workers are satisfied with their current position, yet open to a new job. That means almost half of your satisfied employees would entertain a recruiter’s call for better growth opportunities, or one of the other factors mentioned above.

Social Media: Preferred Research Tool

By 2025, Millennials will comprise 75 percent of the workforce, and that’s not too far off. Millennials approach a company very differently than any generation that preceded them. They have more tools to thoroughly research not only the company but the people who work there. They use Facebook and LinkedIn to learn more about the backgrounds of the team they might be joining; specifically, they want to know if their values, backgrounds and skills match up with their own.

Instant Access Job Search

Gone is the day when job searches were conducted furtively via one or two platforms. Instagram, Snapchat and Pinterest have joined Facebook and LinkedIn for social job hunting. The use of mobile apps and social media compel companies to constantly update the ways in which they reach out to job seekers. In fact, companies vying for the attention of top candidates need to stay engaged in what motivates those employees, as well as how they choose to receive their information.

We find that millennials are more responsive to us via electronic communication, as opposed to phone calls. We are finding that the best way to reach millennials is via text, email and social media—a major shift from previous generations.

Technology will continue to dramatically change the ways that job candidates access information about companies and their open positions. Companies that want to attract top talent will need to determine whether their benefits packages speak to the values and needs of today’s job seekers. They also need to be sure they are reaching the best pool of talent in the way their future employees want to be reached.

 

 


 

Lutz Talent is the premier search firm in Accounting and Finance direct-hire placement and temporary staffing in the Omaha, Lincoln, Hastings, Grand Island, and greater Nebraska, South Dakota, and Western Iowa region. Our years of individual experience and company-wide expertise in the industry enable us to source the precise talent to fit our clients’ needs, with a shared sense of urgency and emphasis on confidentiality. We pride ourselves in finding the right fit for candidates and clients alike. If you are looking for a tailored approach to your search, contact Josh Boesch, jboesch@lutz.us, to discuss further.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.778.7940

jboesch@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JOSH BOESCH + LUTZ TALENT SHAREHOLDER  

Josh Boesch is a Lutz Talent Shareholder with over 14 years of audit and recruiting experience. He heads the Lutz Talent division, a service that helps clients identify “the ideal candidate” to meet their business goals, challenges, culture and vision. His experience as a CPA and his approach to gaining an in-depth understanding of the client’s talent needs, including the skills, experience, cultural understanding and personality fit, has been integral to his success.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Recruiting and Search Services
  • Confidential Replacements
  • Temporary Staffing
  • Salary Reviews
  • Position Description & Advertising Analysis
  • Screening & Selection Assistance
  • Outplacement Services
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Accounting Careers Committee Vice Chairman
  • Institute for Internal Auditors - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • Information Systems Audit and Control Association - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • American Payroll Association - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Association for Corporate Growth - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA, Accounting and Managerial Information Systems, Creighton University, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Volunteer
  • Knights of Columbus, Finance Committee and Membership Vice Chairman

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

GRAND ISLAND + NORTH 

403 Lexington Circle

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.384.9910

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND + SOUTH

2722 S Locust Street

Grand Island, NE 68801

P: 308.382.7850

How to Run a First-Rate Internship Program

How to Run a First-Rate Internship Program

INSIGHTS

How to Run a First-Rate Internship Program

MARISA GIFT, TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

As tax season winds down at Lutz, we say good bye to a large class of interns who have been a part of Lutz during this year’s busy season. Our interns play a valuable role in helping us give great, timely service to our clients while also adding energy to an already vibrant office! Here are some of the lessons we have learned over the years about running a top-notch internship program.

Establish clear expectations

This starts in the recruiting process when describing what an internship will involve and it carries forward into the orientation and onboarding processes. Be sure to set time aside for interns to hear what is expected of them from managers and HR personnel. Ideally, this will happen on Day One but it doesn’t end there. It is imperative to offer timely feedback to interns as they complete assignments so they can learn how to improve their work going forward.

Use a variety of training tools

Along with traditional classroom training, try using case studies to allow interns to feel more comfortable with the task at hand before diving in “for real.” Along these same lines, shadowing a more experienced employee is also a great training tool. Finally, having a go-to resource, such as a mentor, identified for each intern is also helpful.

Be accessible 

There’s nothing worse than a closed door when you have a concern or a voicemail that never gets returned when you need a question answered. A culture of “open doors” goes a long way in giving interns a meaningful experience (not to mention all other team members, too)!

Offer challenging work 

Long gone are the days of filling coffee cups and making photocopies. Interns today expect meaningful work that offers them valuable lessons in their career field of choice. Think of interns as new staff members who need a little extra supervision.

Showcase your culture

Be sure that interns are invited to events and social gatherings both in and outside of the office. Send them to lunch with a variety of team members at different levels. Teach them about the history of your company as well as your vision for the future. Let your culture shine!

Follow these tips for running your internship program and you will soon find that your interns may quickly become your best source of full-time talent in the future. Furthermore, if you give them a great experience, there’s also a good chance they will recruit their friends down the road!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

mgift@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

MARISA GIFT + TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Marisa Gift is the Training and Development Manager at Lutz with over 15 years of experience. She helps shape the firm’s training and development strategy while also managing Lutz’s campus recruiting, orientation and mentoring programs.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Human Resources
  • Training
  • Leadership Development
  • Campus Recruiting
  • Performance
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association for Talent Development, Member
  • Human Resource Association of the Midlands, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Communication Studies & Politics, Drake University, Des Moines, IA
  • MA in Communication, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Publicity Committee
  • Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Music Ministry
  • Drake University National Alumni Board of Directors, Past Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © 2018 Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

GRAND ISLAND + NORTH 

403 Lexington Circle

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.384.9910

LINCOLN 

601 P Street, Suite 103

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND + SOUTH

2722 S Locust Street

Grand Island, NE 68801

P: 308.382.7850