How to Mitigate the Risk of a Bad Hire

How to Mitigate the Risk of a Bad Hire

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

HOW TO MITIGATE THE RISK OF A BAD HIRE

how to mitigate the risk of a bad hire

josh boesch, LUTZ Talent shareholder

 

Hiring an outstanding employee is important for any company interested in scaling its operations. Sometimes, such employees are not a fit on paper, but their interests and passions match them culturally. This makes talent sourcing challenging and laborious for businesses.

As the proverbial haystack gets larger, it becomes increasingly difficult to find the needle. Yet, recruiters must make an effort to find the perfect match, so their companies don’t risk incurring the cost of a re-hire. This blog will drill deeper into some of the costs associated with a bad hire and provide measures to mitigate the associated risks.

 

The Cost of a Bad Hire

A bad hire costs your company more than a couple of paychecks. Think of the expenses incurred in screening, hiring, onboarding, and training the candidate. According to the US Department of Labor, a bad hire can cost you up to 30% of the candidate’s first year’s salary. In their evaluation, CareerBuilder noted that 75% of companies who made a bad hire incurred an average of $14,900 as associated costs.

In addition to monetary costs, bad hires can lower the productivity of both workmates and their supervisors. In a recent study, Chief Finance Officers noted that bad hires result in managers spending 17% of their (otherwise productive) time supervising actively disengaged and poorly performing employees. Also, a study by Gallup estimates that poorly performing employees can cost a company $450-$550 billion in lost productivity per year.

Added to that is lost clients due to dissatisfaction and damaged reputation. If you resolve to fire the candidate, they can leave bad reviews of your company online, which can also damage your reputation. They can also decide to sue you for ‘wrongful’ termination, leading to extra costs in the form of legal fees. Then there is the money used to source, recruit, and onboard a replacement! Hiring the wrong talent is expensive and can significantly affect your bottom line. To that end, let us look at how to mitigate the risk of a bad hire.

 

Evaluate the Marketplace

Conducting a market evaluation is essential in understanding the open position in your organization. To assist in ensuring a quality hire, one must define the role, responsibilities, expected outcomes, proposed salary, etc. 

Defining the role, responsibilities, and outcomes

To better define the role, evaluate your corporate culture first. What are your values, lifestyle norms, and leadership styles? The candidate should be a fit for both the company and the role, and while technical skills are teachable, the behavior is hard to change.

Next, engage your team (could be company leaders or otherwise) to drill deeper into the vacant position’s needs. What skills and qualities are you looking for?

When done with the “internal” market evaluation, it is time to head online. Search for community sites like Inbound.org and LinkedIn. Use their built-in search functions and filters to comb through “position-related” profiles. The key here is to articulate the aspects that define an ideal candidate. In the end, you will have concrete knowledge of what background, skill sets, experiences, and other traits, to expect when forming an ideal candidate.

Next, use this information to craft a concise job description. Ensure that the job ad is detailed enough to help recruiters and HR professionals keep an eye on the right talent and educate potential candidates about the role’s essential requirements. Ideally, prospective candidates should have a feel of what they are signing up for – upon reading the job description.

Be sure to include:

  • The role, its responsibilities, and expected outcomes
  • The required background, skills set, experience, and ideal personal characteristics.

Pro tip: You should set the requirements’ bar high enough – as if targeting only the top 10% performers in the marketplace.

Establishing a salary range

First, determine your compensation philosophy. Next, look at pay rates for individuals doing similar duties in the same niche, industry, and region. Often, pay rates are set via market pay studies.

To ease the process, work with an external recruiter to determine what your ideal talent is earning in the marketplace. Note, a recruiter can help you determine whether your expectations are viable based on your expected performance at a given price point. 

 

Ensure a Large Candidate Pool

Finding prospects with the right skill set is a hurdle in talent acquisition, with the culprits being a low number of applications or limited qualified candidates. Thus, writing a concise job description and posting it on various job boards is not enough. In any case, such a strategy will only limit your candidate pool to the people actively looking for a job.

In addition to posting job ads, comb through online profiles, and send customized messages to anyone you feel is qualified. Also, tap into your network for referrals. According to Jobvite, employee referrals have a lower turnover rate compared to candidates hired through job boards. Besides, hiring through referrals is 55% faster than through a career site.

For best results, partner with a quality recruiter to help identify even the passive candidates who are highly qualified for the position. Quality recruiters have a database and network full of passive candidates receptive to another opportunity but are not actively clicking the ‘Apply’ button. They can also offer insights on hiring the right talent remotely (if it is the only option).

 

Follow a Structured Interview Process

The interviewing process is all about gathering data. This is done in many ways; face-to-face interviewing, skills, behavioral and cognitive assessments, and calling on references who have seen their work in action. Ask impactful and meaningful questions that relate to your company’s needs and wants. The key here is to envision how the candidate in question will contribute to your business and what influence they will have on the existing team culture. And while it may come down to using your gut in making the final decision, you should establish the following about each prospective candidate:

What they are looking for

When going through their resume and asking case, behavioral, and job interest-based questions; strive to understand the candidate’s needs. Could it be career growth, higher compensation, work-life balance, or greater responsibility?

Whichever it is, understand what the candidate is looking for and determine whether you can meet their demands. People will be more motivated and productive in your workplace, and will want to stick around longer if they perceive your organization to be meeting their needs.

Their story

Dig into their previous roles. That is, what were the candidates hired to do? What did they do? Their strengths and weaknesses? Why did they leave their positions? What would their manager and teammates say about them?

While learning their story, check their online presence. Does the candidate use proper judgment in what they share about themselves? What online presence do they have? What do the comments in their posts reveal about them?

Check references!

Never skip checking references for any potential candidate. It is your one chance to validate what you’ve heard in interviews or read on resumes. Talk to previous supervisors and managers to get their viewpoint concerning the candidate’s success in their former roles.

Be thorough. Dedicate 30-45 minutes to dig past “the confirmation of the dates of employment.” Ideally, you should know whether the candidate was a good hire, and if the reference provider seems unenthusiastic to discuss the candidate in question. Get to understand the “why.”

In conclusion, hiring the wrong candidate is very costly. However, the associated risks can be mitigated in a myriad of ways. The above methods and processes could be more time-consuming, and they require a set of skills too. However, investing a little extra time in the hiring process can pay dividends by not having to deal with a bad hire. Partner with a qualified recruiter like Lutz Talent to assist with the process whenever possible. We embrace your business as our own to energize the right solutions and help you thrive. Contact us for questions or if you need help with your staffing. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.778.7940

jboesch@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JOSH BOESCH + LUTZ TALENT SHAREHOLDER  

Josh Boesch is a Lutz Talent Shareholder with over 14 years of audit and recruiting experience. He heads the Lutz Talent division, a service that helps clients identify “the ideal candidate” to meet their business goals, challenges, culture and vision. His experience as a CPA and his approach to gaining an in-depth understanding of the client’s talent needs, including the skills, experience, cultural understanding and personality fit, has been integral to his success.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Recruiting and Search Services
  • Confidential Replacements
  • Temporary Staffing
  • Salary Reviews
  • Position Description & Advertising Analysis
  • Screening & Selection Assistance
  • Outplacement Services
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Accounting Careers Committee Vice Chairman
  • Institute for Internal Auditors - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • Information Systems Audit and Control Association - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • American Payroll Association - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Association for Corporate Growth - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA, Accounting and Managerial Information Systems, Creighton University, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • St. Vincent de Paul Parish, Volunteer
  • Knights of Columbus, Finance Committee and Membership Vice Chairman

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OMAHA

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Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

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Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

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Lincoln, NE 68508

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Lutz adds Frei, Gaston and Stone to Omaha Office

Lutz adds Frei, Gaston and Stone to Omaha Office

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Will Frei
Annie Gaston
Jana Stone

Lutz adds frei, gaston and stone to omaha office

Lutz, a Nebraska-based business solutions firm, welcomes Will Frei, Annie Gaston, and Jana Stone to its Omaha office. 

Will Fei joins Lutz’s Accounting division as a Staff Accountant in the audit department. He is responsible for providing credibility to clients through financial reporting. In addition, he works to maintain a high level of objectivity and confidentiality in all areas for clients in a variety of industries. Frei graduated from Hastings College with a Bachelor’s degree in accounting.

Annie Gaston joins Lutz’s firm admin department as an Administrative Assistant. She is responsible for providing administrative support to the firm including continued education recordkeeping, tax return processing and other duties as assigned. Graduating from Midland University, Gaston received her Bachelor’s degree in arts management.

Jana Stone joins Lutz’s Talent division as a Talent Sourcer. She is responsible for interviewing and placing candidates for Lutz Talent clients. Jana focuses on the accounting, finance, office administration, and human resources industries. She received her Bachelor’s degree in communications and biblical studies from Grace University.

RECENT POSTS

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Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Enhance Your Management Style with Gallup’s CliftonStrengths

Enhance Your Management Style with Gallup’s CliftonStrengths

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

ENHANCE YOUR MANAGEMENT STYLE WITH GALLUP’S CLIFTONSTRENGTHS

enhance your management style with gallup’s cliftonstrengths

Stephanie hand, human resources shareholder

 

There are many ways to use Gallup’s CliftonStrengths assessment beyond just knowing your team’s strengths. To derive the most benefit from the assessment, you can put the information to use by instituting strengths-based management practices in your organization. Adopting a strengths-based approach has been shown to lead to measurable improvements in employee engagement, morale, and overall retention.

If your team is considering taking the StrengthsFinder assessment, but you’re not sure how to apply the results, below are five ways that managers are using the insights from CliftonStrengths to create positive change in their organizations.

 

1. To improve the feedback process

Feedback plays a vital role in setting and adjusting expectations and future outcomes that drive employee behavior. However, not all feedback is created equal. Research shows that only 26% of employees believe that feedback helps to improve their work. Many times, this is because managers don’t often provide effective feedback. 

A key theme in delivering useful feedback is that it’s given from a strengths-based approach: it focuses on celebrating the good, learning from the less-than-ideal, and recognizing the potential for growth and development based on the areas in which an employee excels. Effective, strengths-based feedback has been shown to enhance employee well-being and engagement as well as increase work productivity and job satisfaction.

One of the best ways managers can capitalize on the benefits of strengths-based feedback is to review employee strengths to understand how those strengths are contributing to both their successes and challenges. If a strength is “turned on high volume” it has the potential to get in an individual’s way because sometimes there is too much of a good thing! Discussing challenges from a strengths perspective allows managers to frame feedback more positively, celebrate and challenge employees in the areas in which they’re most skilled, and proactively find ways to support them in spaces where low performance is likely — all through a lens of greater understanding.

 

2. To facilitate delegation

The ability of managers to delegate tasks is crucial to the success of any business, yet many base delegation primarily on one factor: availability. However, assigning work to someone who has the most time to dedicate to a project doesn’t guarantee that you’re allocating resources most effectively. Instead, research suggests that strengths-based delegation is a better predictor of efficiency and productivity. 

When a manager understand employee strengths, they can delegate roles and responsibilities to team members based on the areas in which they’ll naturally excel. Applied properly, strengths-based delegation can effectively expand an overall team capacity by making better use of the talent available. It can also help to make future hiring decisions as a manager knows which strengths the team could use more of to offset the current skill set.

 

3. For motivational purposes

In the strengths-based perspective, talent and motivation are critically related. Talents are our natural ways of thinking, feeling, or behaving; needs are the things that will leave us fulfilled; motivation is the driving force that connects the two. Strengths play a vital role in this equation because talents and strengths are nearly synonymous. That means that when a manager takes the time to understand an employee’s strengths, they will also be able to better recognize the connection between what they’re good at and what they’re striving to achieve. In turn, this offers insight into the best way to manage, motivate, and engage that individual based on their unique attributes.

 

4. Coaching on performance.

Feedback is used to give employees information on their past performance, but coaching is all about the potential they have to shine in the future. Knowledge of an employee’s strengths (those that are obvious on the surface and those that aren’t) allows a manager to work with an individual to craft goals that are actionable, attainable, and most likely to lead to further successes — because they’re based on the areas in which the employee is naturally gifted. This growth-minded, strengths-based approach creates a more positive work environment, boosting employee engagement and retention, and promoting team morale. 

 

5. Increasing collaboration 

A manager can’t moderate every meeting, so employees should also be familiar with the top five themes of their team. Encouraging them to apply this strength-based lens to projects even when a manager isn’t around can help foster understanding for one another’s work styles, improve assignment of duties, better manage expectations, and enhance team member interaction. Additionally, when everyone is aligned with a role that plays to their strengths, they’ll rely on each other’s contributions to help flesh out the full picture — one that will probably be completed faster and with a better result with everyone positioned in the “right” role.

These are just a handful of many benefits companies can reap by incorporating strengths-based management practices. For more ideas or information about applying a strengths-based approach to your team or administering a StrengthsFinder assessment, contact us today.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

shand@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

STEPHANIE HAND + HUMAN RESOURCES SHAREHOLDER

Steph Hand is a Human Resources Shareholder at Lutz with over 19 years of experience. She plays a key role in the people strategy for the firm including Lutz’s performance management process, employee relations and retention, talent management and benefits and compliance efforts.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Human Resources
  • Performance
  • Culture
  • Recruiting
  • Talent Management
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Human Resource Association of the Midlands, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management, Member
  • Society for Human Resource Management Certified Professional
  • Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR)
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Education, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
  • MA in Communication, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

8 Ways First Time Job Seekers Can Beef Up Their Resumes

8 Ways First Time Job Seekers Can Beef Up Their Resumes

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

8 Ways First Time Job Seekers Can Beef Up Their Resumes

8 ways first time job seekers can beef up their resumes

katy doyle, recruiter

 

Getting a job for the very first time requires some song-and-dance to get over the starting hurdles. One of the biggest challenges in landing that first job is writing a resume. Your resume is supposed to be a detailed list of your previous work experience, but what do you do when you don’t have any, or not enough to impress anyone yet?

Here’s where first-time position hiring should be considered. The person hiring you probably knows this is your first (or almost first) job, and they’re not expecting the resume of a 10-year pro. They’re expecting the resume of a student just stepping into adult life. So, to fill out your resume, give them what they really want: A look at the type of student you are – someone whose current experience and skills could be the stuff of a great employee.

1. List your GPA and Education Level (If Good)

Start with your header information. If you’re a good student and it would reflect well on you, include your GPA along with your current level of education (school and year). Technical entry-level employers, especially those who offer inline training, like to see a high GPA. It says you’re smart with an aptitude for learning and following directions.

 

2. Functional vs. Chronological Resume Designs

Most resumes are chronological – written in order of when each item occurred. But you can also write a functional resume – grouping your experiences and skills based on category. For example, you can have a category of technical skills vs. a category of managing experience. People with very little experience to quantify and those with too much experience to list both tend to favor functional resume design. 

 

3. List Relevant Classes and Training as Experience

Because you are just starting, the specific classes or unpaid training you’ve undergone will make up the majority of your relevant pre-job experience. So, list it! If you took Webmastry and attended computer-based summer camps in school, list them as part of your application to a tech job. If you did job training classes in high school and college, list those as experience. If you went through specific training or certification, be sure to list these as well. 

 

4. List Unpaid Internships and Volunteer Experience

Just because you weren’t paid doesn’t mean you don’t have job experience. If you have done volunteer work for charities or businesses, mention both what you did and what you learned. If you served as an unpaid intern, these positions were designed to fill out a young person’s resume. Employers love to see if you already have one foot in the door as an employee in professional work environments.

 

5. Bullet-Point the Details

For each class or internship you list, include a few bullet-points that enumerate what your duties were, what you achieved, and possibly something important that you learned from the role. These bullet points will look good, read better than a paragraph, and make your resume look longer on the page.

 

6. Define the Software You are Proficient With

Software proficiency is a big deal in the modern job market, even for entry-level positions.  Fortunately, most young first-time professionals have a long list of software they are already great with. From graphic design to social media to business software to industry-specific programs – list what you’re good at and give a rough indication of your skill level. Anything you’re a pro at, list it first and include a few bullet-points on what you can do/have done.

 

7. Include Student Sports and Extracurriculars in a Separate Category

If you’ve done sports, art, and other extracurricular activities, mention them near the bottom of your functional-design resume in their own category. Though this information isn’t strictly relevant, it shows that you are a well-rounded person who likes to stay busy. 

 

8. Mention Special Academic or Performance Achievements

Finally, mention your achievements. Suppose you won the science fair, your choir went to a state-level competition, or your school gave you an academic achievement – whatever the achievement, list that on your first resume. This shows that you pursue your talents with success. Employers are always keeping an eye out for new hires that strive to push past average.

Not sure how to write your very first resume? It doesn’t have to be an intimidating experience. We can help you quantify your real-world experiences so far and build them into a resume that will get you hired. If you have any questions, contact us today. We look forward to helping you win that very first professional role in the workforce.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.763.2976

kdoyle@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

KATY DOYLE + RECRUITER

Katy Doyle is a Recruiter at Lutz Talent with over nine years of experience in the recruiting industry. Her primary responsibility is placing candidates for Lutz Talent clients, as well as filling internal roles at Lutz. Doyle specializes in search and staffing for accounting and finance positions.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Recruiting
  • Accounting and Finance Industry
  • Networking

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Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Small Business Staff Planning Tips & Tricks

Small Business Staff Planning Tips & Tricks

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Small Business Staff Planning Tips & Tricks

small business staff planning tips & tricks

Business owners within every industry are facing the challenge of maintaining an efficient staff. Some difficult scenarios can come from not having a staffing approach – such as overstaffing or overworking the few good employees you do have. In this webinar, Steve Guenther and Katy Doyle of Lutz Talent cover strategies when it comes to staffing your small business.

RECENT POSTS

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Benefits of Temporary Staffing During Times of Crisis

Benefits of Temporary Staffing During Times of Crisis

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Benefits of Temporary Staffing During Times of Crisis

Benefits of temporary staffing during times of crisis

chris bouchard, director oftalent acquisition

 

Economic crises bring adverse effects on businesses, sometimes forcing them to downsize, cut employee hours, or impose a hiring freeze. This mostly happens when it’s not known how long an emergency will last. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has not been any different. Many businesses have been affected as far as their employees are concerned.

Unfortunately, these steps pose some dangers to companies. The impact of losing the workforce is quite significant, especially since there is still work to be done and goals to meet. Having staff working remotely may not provide the optimal solution since their productivity may not be at its peak. This is where the need to find temporary workforce solutions comes in handy. The inherent flexibility of temporary workers is an effective way to get work done at a lesser cost but on time.

Why Temporary Staffing?

One way to see where the economy is headed is to analyze the current staffing trends. As companies look to cut down on their expenses, they rely on more affordable labor to keep their businesses running. One of the most significant reasons for hiring temporary staff is the flexibility that comes with it.

While employers may not seek help with the more complex job, they might need an extra pair of hands for routine tasks. Thus, they’re on the lookout for trained and qualified personnel to work temporarily. This frees up the rest of the full-time team to concentrate on more specialized assignments. The presence of temporary workers keeps regular employees fully productive without overworking them, thus reducing the risk of losing great talent.

Cost-Effectiveness

If your company is forced to downsize, as many have during COVID, hiring temporary employees is an affordable option to replace full-time staff. Depending on the positions they’re hired for, temporary staff may demand higher or lower pay. However, since they don’t get other company benefits offered to regular employees, hiring them is usually cheaper.

Additional Expertise to the Company

As you hire temporary employees, you may find new and better talent that you didn’t have before. For example, your company may lack computer specialists or senior executives with detailed experience in their niche. Bringing them on board temporarily helps meet the short-term goals at a reduced cost.

During a crisis, there’s usually an overabundance of qualified candidates looking for placements. Most of them are willing to take up projects as temporary staff to gain exposure in a working environment. They want to bring value to a company’s table while making some money doing it. It’s therefore easy to find the right talent for the vacant positions in your company.

Low Costs of Hiring and Training

When you hire temporary staff through staffing agencies, you increase your chances of finding the right employees. Agencies prescreen candidates, so you can be sure they have the skills needed for the position you’re hiring. Keep in mind that just because someone seeks a temporary position doesn’t mean they’re unskilled. Retirees with high qualifications, for example, sometimes seek short-term assignments.

With the technological advancement the world is experiencing today, it’s easy to set up your temporary staff to work remotely. In so doing, you’ll spend less on training costs yet get value for your investment.

The new employees also receive on-the-job training. You can evaluate the usefulness and the value they bring to your business during their engagement period. If the crisis ends and you feel like you’d want to hire them, it’ll be cheaper for the company. These types of employees become what is commonly known as temp-to-hire workers.

On their downside, temporary staff may not be the cure-all solution. Sometimes, hiring full-time employees is a better approach. Short-term employees may take time to get up-to-speed with company values and procedures. They also may not have the same level of loyalty as full-time employees.

Overall, the benefits of hiring temporary staff outweigh the downsides. When employed in the right company at the right time, they can solve numerous short-term problems.

Find Help with Your Staffing Needs

Hiring temporary workers may be the best solution for your business during a crisis. Unfortunately, you may not have the time to handle the recruiting process. This is where we can help. Contact us at Lutz Talent if you have any questions or need assistance in filling your temporary staffing needs.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.769.7059

cbouchard@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

CHRIS BOUCHARD + DIRECTOR OF TALENT ACQUISITION

Chris Bouchard is the Director of Talent Acquisition at Lutz Talent with over 13 years of staffing and recruiting experience. He will lead the team’s business development efforts from a direct-hire and temporary staffing perspective as well as strategic assessment and selection of potential candidates with an emphasis on human resource and accounting positions. His approach to gaining an in-depth understanding of the client’s talent needs, including the skills, experience, cultural understanding and personality fit, has been and will continue to be integral to his success.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Recruiting and Search Services
  • Confidential Replacements
  • Temporary Staffing
  • Salary Reviews
  • Position Description & Advertising Analysis
  • Screening & Selection Assistance
  • Outplacement Services
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Association for Corporate Growth, Member
  • Financial Executives International, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Habitat for Humanity, Volunteer
  • Together, Volunteer

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850