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JANUARY RETIREMENT PLAN NEWSLETTER

SIX EASY STEPS TO KEEP YOUR PLAN ASSETS SAFE

Six Easy Steps to Keep Your Plan Assets Safe

Cyber fraud is a growing concern globally. Individuals are typically very careful to keep their bank account and email authentication information safe, but they aren’t always smart with the rest of their personal information.

Participants need to be vigilant with their retirement savings accounts as well. In the past year we’ve seen a slew of cases of attempted fraud – some successful – against retirement savings plan participants across a multitude of recordkeepers.

The good news is that virtually all recordkeepers view security as a prominent priority and diligently update their technology. However, their security can only go so far if the participant isn’t being equally vigilant. Educate your plan participants on the following tips to ensure the security of their retirement savings accounts.

 

  1. Use all available levels of authentication. If your plan’s recordkeeper comes out with a new type of authentication, your participants should implement it immediately.
  2. If participants frequent a website or have an account with a company whose website and information has been compromised, they should change all their passwords for all online accounts.
  3. Remind participants to use strong passwords. Utilize letters, capitalization, numbers and symbols. Don’t use recognizable words. Don’t use the same password for multiple purposes. Have the password be at least 14 characters in length. Consider changing passwords frequently. Using a password manager can make this task less unwieldly.
  4. Don’t send authentication information to any third parties, and remind participants to limit authentication access to use on sites which are navigated to independently – not through a link or other prompt.
  5. Check your participants’ accounts frequently and address any irregularities, and remind participants to keep an eye out, too.
  6. Ask participants to immediately contact you if they receive any “updates” that look suspicious so you can notify your recordkeeper.

 

Keep your participants in the know. We recommend sending them the participant memo that is included with this newsletter on the importance of remaining vigilant when it comes to cybersecurity – it’s one of the most important investments your participants can make.

For more information on keeping your plan assets safe from cyberattack, please contact your plan advisor.

 

About the Author, Joel Shapiro

Joel ShapiroAs a former practicing ERISA attorney Joel works to ensure that plan sponsors stay fully informed on all legislative and regulatory matters. Joel earned his Bachelor of Arts from Tufts University and his Juris Doctor from Washington College of Law at the American University.

RECORDS AND THEIR EXPIRATION DATES

“What records should I keep? How long should I keep them? How should I organize my files?”

Advisors have been asked these questions time and time again by plan sponsors looking for a general guideline for record expiration dates.

Record retention doesn’t need to be a mystery, and the filing system doesn’t need to become a tomb. For audits, remember the following requirements.

 

chart 1

 

As for organizing your fiduciary file, we suggest a format that includes the following sections:

chart 2

 

If a participant or DOL agent requested plan information, could you find it quickly? The key is twofold: keep the things you need and store them so you can find them easily.  Of course, these are only general guidelines. For questions about your specific case, contact your plan advisor to discuss best practices for keeping records.

 

About the Author, Joel Shapiro

Joel ShapiroAs a former practicing ERISA attorney Joel works to ensure that plan sponsors stay fully informed on all legislative and regulatory matters. Joel earned his Bachelor of Arts from Tufts University and his Juris Doctor from Washington College of Law at the American University.

HEY JOEL!

Welcome to Hey Joel! This forum answers plan sponsor questions from all over the country by our in-house former practicing ERISA attorney.

Hey Joel,

Will hardship suspensions go away in January 2019? If someone takes a hardship today, do we stop the suspension on Jan. 1 2019? – Anxious in Alabama

 

Dear Anxious,

First, understand that we are all still awaiting further guidance from the IRS/Treasury on the new hardship safe harbor rules. The suspensions don’t so much as “go away” as much as the necessity to suspend deferrals potentially becomes optional. That said, if a plan wants to keep the suspension, I believe they may do so.
The only question would be whether or not the safe harbor remains intact for the plan sponsor. As originally stated, we are still waiting on additional guidance from the IRS/Treasury on whether or not all the new rules would be required, or are just optional, for the safe harbor protection.

 

Also Anxious,

Joel Shapiro

 

About Joel Shapiro, JD, LLM

As a former practicing ERISA attorney Joel works to ensure that plan sponsors stay fully informed on all legislative and regulatory matters. Joel earned his Bachelor of Arts from Tufts University and his Juris Doctor from Washington College of Law at the American University.

PARTICIPANT CORNER: KEEP YOUR PLAN ASSETS SAFE

This month’s employee memo reminds participants to remain vigilant when it comes to the cybersecurity of their retirement plans. Download the memo from your Fiduciary Briefcase at fiduciarybriefcase.com and distribute to your participants. Please see an excerpt below.

You work hard for your money. You wisely choose to defer a portion of your salary for your interests in your retirement years. The plan is designed to help you grow your savings to an appropriate amount of money to support you once you reach your retirement years.

But as you are aware, the plan is only as effective as you make it. If you defer too little or make unwise investment decisions there is a chance that you will not reach your goals. Similarly, if you drain your plan balance over the years, you understand you will find a shortfall in retirement. What many participants do not think about is being responsible for the security of their savings as well.

Cyber fraud has been a growing concern globally for years. Individuals are typically very careful to keep their security measures (passwords, authentication codes, etc.) private with regards to their banking and electronic mail accounts. However, in the past few years, there have been breaches of major companies containing personal information of individuals. And unfortunately, much of the personal information has become accessible by bad actors on the dark web.

Participants need to be vigilant with their retirement savings accounts as well. In the past 12 months, there have been a slew of cases of attempted fraud, some successful, enacted on retirement savings plan participants. And these attempts have occurred across a multitude of recordkeepers. The good news is that virtually all recordkeepers have security as a prominent priority and spend. They are constantly updating their security technology and protocols. But their security can only go so far if the participant is not being equally vigilant.

 

The following are a few prudent tips for participants in ensuring the security of their retirement savings accounts:

  • Use multiple levels of security and authentication – if your plan’s recordkeeper comes out with a new level/type of authentication, engage it immediately.
  • If you frequent a website or have an account with a company, whose website and information has been compromised, change all your passwords. For example, Yahoo recently had a large breach – a breach containing passwords – if you ever had a Yahoo account you should change your password.
  • Make sure your password is strong – utilize letters, capitalization, numbers, and symbols. Don’t use recognizable words. Don’t use the same password for multiple purposes. Have the password be at least 14 characters in length. Consider changing your password on a frequent basis.
  • Never send your authentication to anyone requesting it. It should be limited to use on sites on which you navigated to independently of any outside request.
  • Check your account on a semi-regular basis for any irregularities.
  • Immediately contact your plan administrator and/or the recordkeeper if you receive any update that sparks your concern – do not wait, the money could leave the U.S. quickly.

 

As your employer, we are always looking out for your wellbeing. We trust that the plan is in good hands with our recordkeeper. We have reviewed their cyber security protocols and technology. But we felt a need to provide a gentle reminder that your involvement is crucial in maintaining the security of your account too.

We want your savings experience to be as simple and easy as possible. We want you to someday enjoy your retirement years.

DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results.  Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by Lutz Financial (“Lutz”), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful.  Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from Lutz.  To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing.  Lutz is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the newsletter content should be construed as legal or accounting advice.  A copy of the Lutz’s current written disclosure Brochure discussing our advisory services and fees is available upon request. Please Note: If you are a Lutz client, please remember to contact Lutz, in writing, if there are any changes in your personal/financial situation or investment objectives for the purpose of reviewing/evaluating/revising our previous recommendations and/or services, or if you would like to impose, add, or to modify any reasonable restrictions to our investment advisory services. Lutz shall continue to rely on the accuracy of information that you have provided.

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