Lutz adds Scott Sutton to Grand Island Office

Lutz adds Scott Sutton to Grand Island Office

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Lutz adds Scott Sutton to Grand Island Office

Lutz, a Nebraska-based business solutions firm, welcomes Scott Sutton to its Grand Island office.

Scott Sutton joins Lutz’s tech division as an Escalation Engineer. He is responsible for managing escalation issues, as well as, providing onsite technical support to outsourced IT clients. Sutton received his Bachelor’s degree in intercultural ministry from Ethnos360 Missionary Training Center.

 

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

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Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Password Management

Password Management

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

password management

john may, project engineer

 

Few things are as irritating as having to think up new passwords. And just about every app and website you go these days require registering, which means creating a new password. On top of that, it must be one you’ve never used before and nothing that uses any part of your name or would identify you in any way. 

If you think that you’re required to update your passwords more often, and with more rules (large caps, small case, symbol, fingerprint, no numbers in sequence) than you used to, you’re right. Keeping your information safe is paramount for most websites, and keeping cybercriminals at bay is more of a challenge than ever. 

The Science Of Passwords 

Even the simplest password is more than just what you tap onto your screen. ABC12335 turns into a much longer series of random alphanumeric symbols within the app. In the tech industry, this is called password hashing–putting your simple password into an algorithm that converts it to a jumbled assortment of characters. When passwords are hashed, it’s a lot harder for cybercriminals to hack.

Going a step further, into securing your information, some companies have added salt to the hash. One of the flaws with hashing is that it spits out a uniform code for a given password–“mydog” would consistently translate to DHE_N &RVOJ Ihi457p3ournc. When a salting layer is added, every time you type in “mydog” there’s another series of characters before the hashed password. For example, using hjkrog before the DHE_N sequence. 

Still, despite IT security experts’ best efforts, data breaches are all too common. Cybercriminals aren’t sitting in some basement guessing at your password; there is a mountain of software out there that’s designed to help hackers break through these barriers. 

Two-Layer Verification

Multi-Factor Authorization (MFA) or Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) add another layer of password security for consumers. The most common example of this is using your fingerprint on your smartphone–biometric identification. Another example of 2FA is when you receive a code on your smartphone to access your app. Blockchain is the latest addition to password security. This technology blocks access when an inauthentic user can’t be traced to the beginning point of the security chain. In essence, when they break into one point along the chain, they are blocked from further access.

Managing Your Passwords–Do’s and Dont’s

Here are a few ways to keep your passwords secure. Some are pretty basic, but worth repeating. 

  • Don’t share your passwords with others. Along those lines, don’t use someone else’s device to log into your online banking accounts. That doubly exposes you to cybertheft.
  • Do use a different password for all your accounts. This is as simple as capitalizing a different character, changing spelling, or adding a short word at the end–“my dog rocks” to “myDogrox” to MydogRox”.
  • Do use MFA or 2FA whenever you have the option.
  • Do make your password longer, not heavier on gobbledygook. Use complete sentences, with caps and punctuation–My dog rocks. 
  • Do create passwords that you can remember but are hard to guess–I don’t like pepperoni. 
  • Do be as complex as you can easily remember–I don’T like PePPeron!.

Also, one reason you should not duplicate passwords is that every time you do, you double your chance for a data breach. So, you have a password for Target–IbuyLots–that you also use at TJMaxx and Amazon. If there’s a data breach at one, your risk for fraud is tripled. 

Use A Password Manager

Password managers are like bank vaults for your data. They store all your passwords in one place. The best ones also sync between your devices, autocompleting your password so you don’t have to manually input it every time you log in. When you use one of these apps, you only need to remember one master key. The app does the rest, creating unique passwords for all your websites and apps.

Lastpass is a strong choice for a password manager, either individually or for business. Basic service is free, and for $4 per month, you can manage passwords for the entire family. Lastpass integrates all your password-driven apps and sites to their vault and generates new passwords that are stored there. You can also download your credit cards, prescriptions, and insurance info so all your information is stored in one safe place. 

Dashlane is also one of the best password managers out there. It’s similar to Lastpass in capabilities and pricing, and also offers a business suite. One of Dashlane’s best features is that they implement a zero-knowledge system. Meaning their employees don’t see your information. 

Lutz can manage all your personal and business needs, from tax strategies to talent acquisition to outsourced IT. We’re experts and are happy to work with you, whether it’s advising on an M&A project or helping you decide which password manager is best for you. Please contact us if you have any questions.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

jmay@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

john may + project engineer

John May is a Project Engineer at Lutz Tech with over 10 years of experience in IT. He is responsible for assisting outsourced IT clients with technology infrastructure enhancements.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • IT Infrastructure
  • Technology
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
  • Password Management

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Top 5 Cybersecurity Trends for 2020

Top 5 Cybersecurity Trends for 2020

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

top 5 cybersecurity trends for 2020

eric acker, escalation engineer

 

The cybersecurity landscape is changing every day. With hackers devising new ways to target businesses, cybersecurity professionals are constantly finding new strategies to protect your enterprises. Cyber-attacks are detrimental for companies, causing adverse financial and non-financial implications. Cyber-attacks result in loss of sensitive data, endless lawsuits, and a tarnished reputation. Also, they are expensive, and have even cost businesses approximately $45 billion in 2018.

As cyber-attacks intensify in frequency, companies need to polish their defenses. Thus, enterprises should familiarize themselves with cybersecurity trends for the upcoming year. Such information will help them prepare adequately and avoid falling victim to cyber-attacks.

What else is in store for businesses? Here are the top five cybersecurity trends to expect in 2020.

 

Trend #1. Increase in cybersecurity spending

Cybersecurity spending is on the rise. In 2019, the global cyber security spending was $103 billion. This figure is a 9.4% increase from 2018. The expenditure is projected to increase as companies and industries increasingly invest in cybersecurity solutions to prevent security breaches. In 2020, the US government is projected to spend $17.4 billion on cybersecurity, a 5% increase from 2019.

 

Trend #2. Cybersecurity skills gap

Did you know that 65% of companies report a problematic shortage of cybersecurity staff? Demand for cybersecurity professionals will continue to exceed the supply in 2020 and beyond. Amid this trend, security professionals must grapple with significantly more threats than ever before. Currently, more than 4 million cybersecurity professionals are required to close the skills gap.

Since this skills gap is not closing anytime soon, organizations must embrace strategies to tackle the problematic shortage. Firms can cross-train existing IT professionals, attract workers from other professions, or set applicant qualification requirements at the appropriate level to interest numerous candidates.

 

Trend #3. The growing impact of AI and ML on cybersecurity

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are gradually becoming essential for cybersecurity. A study conducted by Capgemini Research Institute established this fact. From the survey, 69% of the participating executives affirmed that AI is vital when responding to cyber-attacks. Also, three-quarters of the executives contended that AI helps companies to respond quickly to cybercrimes.

Integrating AI with cybersecurity solutions can have positive outcomes–enhancing threat and malicious activity detection and supporting fast responses to cyber-attacks. The market for AI in cybersecurity is growing drastically. A recent Research and Markets report revealed that in 2019, the demand for AI in cybersecurity would surpass $8.8 billion. Furthermore, by 2026, the market is projected to grow to 38.2 billion.

 

Trend # 4. More small businesses will invest in security measures

An alarming 43% of cyber-attacks target small enterprises. On average, the cost of these attacks for a small business is $200,000. What’s more, when these small businesses fall victim to cyber-attacks, 60% of them go out of business within six months.

Cybercriminals target small businesses because they have poor or no preventative mechanisms. Often, a substantial number of small businesses think that they’re too small to be victims of cyber-attacks.

Conversely, savvy small businesses are gradually taking a preventative approach to cybersecurity. Realizing that like big organizations, they are targets for cybercrimes, and hence adapting effective cybersecurity strategies.

As a result, a significant number of small businesses plan to increase their spending on cybersecurity. Also, small businesses are increasingly investing in information security training to improve cyber hygiene.

 

Trend # 5. Cyber-attacks on critical infrastructure

Utilities are vital aspects of the modern economy because they offer crucial support to millions of people across a nation. Such importance makes critical infrastructure an excellent target for cybercriminals.

This trend is forecasted to continue into 2020 and beyond because most public institutions are ill-prepared to handle such attacks. While governments may be inadequately prepared for such attacks, cybercriminals are more than ready for them. Critical infrastructure includes public transportation systems, power grids, and large-scale constructions.

Governments hold critical personal data about their citizens. This information includes personal data on citizens, such as health records, residency, and bank details. If this personal data is not well protected, it could fall in the wrong hands resulting in breaches that could be disastrous.

Ultimately, the difference between an attack on a single organization and critical infrastructure is the magnitude of the effect. In 2015, hackers attacked the Ukraine power grid, leaving thousands of homes in darkness for hours. Could we see more of such attacks in 2020? Only time will tell.

Cybersecurity is a pressing topic for businesses and organizations across all industries. It, therefore, demands concerted efforts from firms in developing appropriate cybersecurity defenses to guard against cyber-attacks.

Want to avoid being on the receiving end of an attack? With so much to learn in terms of types of cyber-attacks, ways of preventing them, and prime target sectors—keep up-to-date with the emerging cybersecurity landscape. Contact us if you have any questions or would like to learn more about our tech services.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

531.500.2007

eacker@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

115 CANOPY STREET

SUITE 200

LINCOLN, NE 68508

ERIC ACKER + ESCALATION ENGINEER

Eric Acker is an Escalation Engineer at Lutz with over 18 years of experience. His primary responsibilities are to manage escalation issues, provide onsite technical support to outsourced IT clients, and assist in mentoring and leading the service help desk.

AREAS OF FOCUS
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • AS in Information Technology, Lincoln School of Commerce, Lincoln, NE
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
  • Top 5 Cybersecurity Trends for 2020

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

A Beginner’s Guide to Purchasing a Workstation

A Beginner’s Guide to Purchasing a Workstation

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

a beginner’s guide to purchasing a workstation

melissa tejral, operations lead

 

In a world where we have technology in the palm of our hands, we can do most things without getting up. Although this is convenient, sometimes things are easier to do on a desktop. This guide will help you determine how to purchase the workstation that will best meet your needs. Some basic items that you should consider when looking to make a purchase are the processor, memory, hard drive, and the operating system.

 

The Processor

The processor is the brain of the computer. The highest processor isn’t always a necessity; in fact, most of the time, the middle of the road works for the majority of functionality. As application vendors continue to change their apps, they tend to require a little more processing power. So, ideally, avoiding the lowest power option will help you stretch the use of your workstation out for longer before needing to purchase a new one.

Currently, the i5 processors are the middle of the road and the best bang for your buck. The 9th generation processors are the most current option available (i5 9XXX). So, for example, if you are comparing models and see something that shows i5 6XXX, that means it is a 6th generation. The 6th generation processor is around three years old and probably still works, but with advancements in the last few years, you may not get the longevity out of it.

 

The Memory

You will typically see this labeled as RAM. Most consumer machines will come with 4GB, 8GB, or 16GB of memory space. Everything that is running on your computer at any time requires memory – every internet tab, application, etc. When very basic use, such as utilizing one application at a time, are the primary use, 4GB will get you by. However, 8GB is going to be your best bet for most everyday use and will allow multiple applications to be up at the same time without a reduction in performance.

 

The Hard Drive

Your hard drive houses all of your computer on it. This includes your operating system, applications, stored files, etc. There are two main options for your hard drive. An HDD is a standard hard drive. These typically come in larger capacities and are less expensive. They have several moving parts and are pretty basic.

The better bang for your buck is to look for a machine with a solid-state hard drive (SSD). These drives are generally faster and have fewer moving parts. They are more expensive for larger capacity drives, but your machine will function better with them, and they tend to last a little longer.

 

The Operating System

The operating system is the blanket that covers your computer. It allows your applications to run. All the components that your computer has on it are tied together in the operating system. So, when you tell an application to run, it gathers all the components of that application and runs it for you.

For Microsoft, the version you want to look for is Windows 10. If you plan to remote into your work computer from your new home computer, you will want to look for Windows 10 Pro as there are more security features. If you find a machine that looks like it’s a steal, but it has Windows 7 on it, you do not want to purchase that as Windows 7 will stop receiving support (updates and patches) from Microsoft in January 2020.

 

Storage

A few other tidbits, if you are someone who typically at home stores a lot of files or photos, you may want to consider an external hard drive. You can purchase larger capacity drives to store all your photos and files, so they are not bogging down your machine. If you run a lot of photo editing software or highly technical designing software, you will want to increase the processor and memory of the machine you purchase.

 

Warranty

Most consumer machines will come with a 1-year warranty. However, you may want to consider protecting your investment for longer by asking for an extended warranty. While most machines should have a lifecycle of about five years, covering that machine for a more significant amount of time will help protect your investment.

Whether your work permits the use of a workstation, or you just prefer to use one, being sure to purchase something that fits your specific needs is essential for optimal functionality. If you have any questions, please contact us today.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.514.9166

mtejral@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

MELISSA TEJRAL + OPERATIONS LEAD

Melissa Tejral is an Operations Lead at Lutz Tech. She is responsible for managing the on-site coordination for support calls, preparing quotes for clients, maintaining IT business review coordination schedules, and assisting account managers and vCIOs.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Outsourced Technology Support
  • Internal Tech Operations
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • Associates in Applied Sciences, Metropolitan Community College, Omaha, NE
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
  • A Beginner's Guide to Purchasing a Workstation

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Decoding Tech Talk: 10 Technology Terms You Should Know

Decoding Tech Talk: 10 Technology Terms You Should Know

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

decoding tech talk: 10 technology terms you should know

Steven brabec, IT account manager

 

Even if you don’t work in an IT department, you interact with technology daily. You don’t need to understand all the nuances of the various concepts and applications, but, at the very least, you should know some basics. Below are ten technology terms you might encounter.

1. Multi-Factor or Two-Factor Authentication: 

A second layer security measure for accessing an account. In addition to entering your username and password (the first authentication factor), you must provide an additional credential. The second credential typically is a randomly generated number or prompt on your phone to finish signing in to your account.

2. Office 365: 

A subscription online software service provided by Microsoft. Depending on your subscription plan, Office 365 can include email, the Microsoft Office software suite, and numerous other collaboration and communication tools.

3. Phishing:

An attempt by a cybercriminal to obtain your password, credit card, or other confidential information via email. Phishing uses deceptive emails and websites that claim and appear to be from legitimate entities.

4. SaaS:

Also known as software as a service. SaaS is a method of licensing an application where it is purchased with a subscription that allows access online. Typically, the application is not installed or hosted on local computers, but in a cloud and usually accessed via web pages.

5. Cloud Hosting:

Instead of managing your own physical server equipment, cloud hosting outsources to a cloud provider, such as Microsoft Azure or Amazon AWS, for storage and computing resources. Cloud hosting is spread across hundreds of virtual servers in the cloud providers network.

6. SIEM:

Also known as security information and event management (SEIM). This is a software solution that collects and analyzes log event data in real-time from network devices and applications to provide IT threat monitoring, event correlation and incident response.

7. Business Continuity:

A way of creating a system of prevention and recovery plans to handle potential threats to a company. Business continuity is an organization’s ability to ensure operations and core business functions are not severely impacted if some unplanned incident, such as a natural disaster or cyberattack, takes critical systems offline.

8. Centralized Password Management:

This consolidates account login credentials for multiple applications and devices across an organization’s network in one single application that requires only one login for access. It also allows IT administers more control over user security.

9. Disk Encryption:

A technology, such as Windows BitLocker, that protects information on a computer’s hard drive or USB flash drive by converting the data into unreadable code that cannot be deciphered easily by unauthorized people. A password key is required to decrypt the data.

10. Business Intelligence:

A technology-driven process of gathering data about various aspects of the business from multiple sources, analyzing the data, and converting that data into information and actionable insights that can be used to make strategic decisions.

 

As the use of technology continues to increase, it’s critical to have a general understanding of its main concepts and applications. This list of decoded terms will equip you with the knowledge necessary to better comprehend and use the various technological systems in our world today. For more information or questions, please contact Lutz Tech.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.778.7960

sbrabec@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

STEVEN BRABEC + IT ACCOUNT MANAGER

Steven Brabec is an IT Account Manager at Lutz Tech with over eight years of information technology experience. He is responsible for working with clients to develop IT solutions that help them reach their business goals. Additionally, he will be providing account management support and IT consulting services. 

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • IT Consulting
  • Account Management
  • IT Security

 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Information Technology, Wayne State College, Wayne, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Pinnacle Bank Championship, Volunteer

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Spotting IT Risks Before They Become a Problem

Spotting IT Risks Before They Become a Problem

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

spotting it risks before they become a problem

jessica murray, LUTZ TECH account manager

 

With technology being as vital as it is to business, staying ahead of your IT troubles is an essential step to keeping your doors open. Being proactive with your IT goes a long way to preventing breaches of your network and sensitive data. Let’s look at some of the lurking threats to your systems and what you can do to spot them before they become a problem.

Infrastructure Risks

How old your hardware is can pose a risk. Once equipment gets more than a few years old, the manufacturer stops supporting it. The lack of updates means there are fewer people with the skills to fix problems, and it makes them more vulnerable to cyber-attacks.

One example of this is spectre, a security vulnerability that has been identified on chips that are over five years old. Using spectre, hackers can access computer data without you knowing.

It can also be difficult to access data and provide the lightning-fast service that many clients demand, as well as rising maintenance and energy costs. Software is similar in that it is only worthwhile as long as it is up to date. Cisco’s Annual Security Report found that out of the 115,000 devices they scanned, 92% ran software with known vulnerabilities. Upgrading your software and hardware will cost money, but it is much cheaper than a full-scale data breach.

Proper Redundancies

Having redundancies in your system is what keeps you up and running when something goes wrong. If something fails, or part of your system loses power, having a back up is essential to keep business running as usual. For smaller companies, this can be as simple as a spare laptop. More prominent companies require having systems like redundant ISPs, firewalls, and other systems.

Keep your data safe

The only way to ensure that your data will always be there and accessible is to back it up. If you have a disaster strike, are a victim to a cyber-attack, or have faulty hardware, still having access to all your data is essential. Data can be backed up on-site, where your business is located, or offsite, either another remote location or in the cloud. Keeping your data backed up in a variety of ways helps to ensure that you’ll always have it. The 3-2-1 back up strategy, for instance, is where you will keep three copies of your data in two different media, and at least one copy is backed up offsite.

If you need to keep it from prying eyes now, encrypt it. That means all communications in and out of your office need to be encrypted. For the most secure network full disk encryption, where the entire hard drive, including data, files, the operating system, and software is locked up, is a good idea. Most major vendors today offer full disk encryption.

Make sure only the Right People Get Access to Your System

People love to be lazy when it comes to picking passwords. Given a choice, we would use the same ones for almost everything. Having a proper password policy in place is crucial to make sure that the passwords your employees are using aren’t easy to predict. Setting minimum standards for length and complexity, having a system to change those passwords, and making sure that nobody is sharing that information helps to close the door on intruders.

Using tools like multi-factor authentication can help tremendously in keeping unwanted people off of your servers. While just a password can be hacked, it is much harder to fake your geolocation or login behavior patterns. Considering that 95% of cyber attacks are done using stolen login data, adding that extra step to your email, VPN and desktop logon will save a lot of headaches.

Business Continuity Plan with Disaster Recovery Plan

You need to have an answer to the question, “What happens when our services drop?” Having a plan in place gets things moving faster to fix problems and keeps people from panicking.

Business continuity refers to maintaining business functions going or quickly restarting them if something happens. If the power goes out, where will everyone work? Will they go home, to another office, to the nearest Starbucks? How will you access data when part of the network is down? How long can you afford to be down, and how can you ensure you won’t go over that time? Who are you going to call? The better you can answer these questions now, the better off you will be when the worst happens.

Start by identifying these things: the scope of the plan, key business areas, critical functions of your business, identify dependencies you have between regions, find the acceptable downtime, and plan how to maintain operations.

Your disaster recovery plan focuses on getting your IT infrastructure up and running after something happens. If a disaster hits, will you be ready? Can you withstand a fire, flood, or cyber-attack? Do you have your data backed up offsite? Do you have a telephone backup plan? Having effective plans tested and in place will allow you to stay competitive no matter what.

In summary, understanding the risks your company faces relating to its technology is crucial in helping prevent any possible issues before they arise. Staying on top of all of these measures will keep your IT up and running and will instill confidence in your company for your clients and customers. If you need assistance, or if you have any questions, contact Lutz Tech today!

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.514.0000

jmurray@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JESSICA MURRAY + ACCOUNT MANAGER

Jessica Murray is an Account Manager at Lutz Tech. She has over 5 years of experience in the technology field. Jessica is a trusted advisor that sees clients through the full sales cycle. Her responsibilities include developing proposals and providing recommendations to clients to assist them in reaching their business goals.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Client Relations
  • Technology
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BS in Management Information Systems, Briar Cliff University, Sioux City, IA

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

 

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850