12.11.2020 | 2020 Stimulus Funding | Recording

12.11.2020 | 2020 Stimulus Funding | Recording

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Healthcare + 2020 Stimulus Funding

12.11.2020 | 2020 STIMULUS FUNDING + HEALTHCARE | Recording

In this presentation, Lutz experts discuss important information and updates, as well as answer frequently asked questions on various stimulus funding opportunities.

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Medicare Bad Debts

Medicare Bad Debts

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Medicare Bad Debts

medicare bad debts

kirk delperdang, healthcare manager

 

Over the years, there have been minimal actual changes to the regulations, manuals, instructions, or other guidance concerning what is allowable and what should or can be claimed for Medicare Bad Debts (MBD) on the Medicare Cost Report (MCR). Hospitals have experienced the reductions that started with fiscal years beginning on/after October 1, 2012. Providers have been subject to the implementation of various interpretations and have tried to keep up. There is new guidance via the IPPS 2021 Federal Register Final Rule to implement immediately related to MBD as you move forward.

CMS has established three types of Medicare Bad Debt categories.

  • Non-indigent beneficiary: A beneficiary who has not been determined to be categorically or medically indigent by a State Medicaid Agency to receive medical assistance from Medicaid and has not been determined to be indigent by the provider for Medicare Bad Debt purpose.
  • Dual eligible beneficiary: A beneficiary who is enrolled in both Medicare (Part A, Part B, or both) and “full Medicaid” and/or the Medicare Savings Program (MSP), including the Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) program.
  • Indigent by provider: A beneficiary who is non-dual eligible and has been determined to be indigent under the provider’s methods for determining indigency, using the evaluation criteria in the PRM §312 A through D.

To claim bad debts on the MCR, the following processes and steps must be taken to ensure that any bad debts claimed on the cost report will stand up to a CMS audit.

 

Non-indigent bad debts

Collection effort must consist of the following:

  • Consistency – Medicare and non-Medicare accounts must have a similar collection effort
  • Billing of accounts:
    • For MCRs beginning before October 1, 2020, – Provider must issue a bill to the beneficiary or the party responsible shortly after discharge or death of the beneficiary
    • For MCRs beginning on/after October 1, 2020, – Provider must issue a bill to the beneficiary or the party responsible on/before 120 days after the latter of the following:
      • Medicare Remittance Advice (RA) date
      • Secondary payer RA date, if applicable, and
      • Date of notification from the Secondary Payer that the service is not covered
    • Additional billing efforts: In addition to the first billing – A provider must include other collection actions in their process (Examples: Subsequent billings, collection letters, telephone calls or other personal contacts)
    • 120-day collection effort:
      • Provider’s collection effort must last at least 120 days from the date of the initial bill before being written off
      • 120-day Restart – The 120-day collection effort starts over each time a payment is made
    • Use of Collection Agencies (CA):
      • Similar collection efforts must be used by any CA for Medicare/non-Medicare accounts
      • Any account still with the CA cannot be claimed as MBD
      • CA Fees – If CA collection efforts are not consistent between Medicare/non-Medicare, the collection fees are not allowable
    • Documentation:
      • The following documentation must be available to the MAC:
        • Bad Debt collection policy, describing the collection process for all payers/accounts
        • Patient account history – Must include the dates of the various aforementioned collection actions
        • Beneficiary’s file with copies of the bill(s) and follow-up notices.

 

Dual Eligible Bad Debts

Collection effort must consist of the following:

  • A provider must submit a bill to the State Medicaid agency for the Medicare cost sharing and submit the Medicaid RA received to Medicare (must bill policy).
    • Any amount the state is obligated to pay cannot be included as an MBD, whether the state pays the amount or not.
  • Must-bill/Medicaid RA exception – A Provider can document a reasonable collection effort for dual eligible beneficiaries when the following alternative documentation to the Medicaid remittance advice is submitted. A provider must submit all the following:
    • The state’s Medicaid notification stating that the state has no obligation to pay or notification that illustrates the provider’s inability to enroll in Medicaid for purposes of processing a crossover cost sharing claim,
    • Documentation establishing the state’s liability, or lack thereof, for the Medicare cost sharing; and
    • Documentation verifying the beneficiary’s eligibility for Medicaid for the date of service.

 

Indigent by Provider

Collection effort must consist of the following:

  • Provider must determine patient indigence via the requirements of CMS PRM §312 A – D.
    • Patient must not be eligible for Medicaid as categorically or medically indigent,
    • Provider cannot accept a beneficiary’s declaration of their inability to pay their medical bills as the only proof of indigence
    • Provider’s analysis of indigency must include BOTH the beneficiary’s assets and income (MAY consider an analysis of liabilities and expenses if indigence cannot be determined using assets and income).
    • Determination by the provider that there is no other legally responsible party
    • Maintain an Indigence Determination Policy describing your process
  • For MCR beginning on or after October 1, 2020
  • CMS recognizes that the determination of indigency for Medicare Bad Debts may be different from that for other internal determinations or payers such as internal policies that allow the “presumptive” eligibility using income only, credit score, zip code, demographics, etc. These may still be used, but the unpaid Medicare deductible and coinsurance may not be claimed as a Medicare Bad Debt.

 

Other considerations – Accounting Perspective and Handling

All the provisions above have addressed the revenue cycle collection processes and requirements to claim the MBD on the cost report. However, within the 2021 IPPS Final Rule, CMS has also addressed the accounting treatment for MBD.

  • For MCRs beginning before October 1, 2020, – MBDs must not be written off as a contractual allowance but must be charged to an expense account for uncollectible accounts
  • For MCRs beginning on/after October 1, 2020, – Bad Debts, Charity, and Courtesy Allowances represent reductions in revenue.
  • For MCRs beginning on/after October 1, 2020, – MBDs must not be written off to a contractual allowance account but rather charged to an uncollectible receivables account that results in a reduction of revenue.

As always, the only amounts that can be claimed as MBD are Part A Medicare deductibles and coinsurance. Deductibles and coinsurance derived from “fee schedule” amounts, i.e., professional fees, are not eligible. Please contact us if you have any questions.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

402.496.8800

kdelperdang@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

KIRK DELPERDANG + HEALTHCARE MANAGER

Kirk Delperdang is a Healthcare Manager at Lutz with over 25 years of experience. He provides accounting and consulting services to healthcare and related organizations.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Healthcare Financial Management Association - Nebraska Chapter, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BA in Accounting, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • St. Vincent de Paul, Knights of Columbus, Member
  • Active in various youth sports leagues: Aldrich Elementary, Millard Athletic Association, Millard North Schools, Omaha FC, Skutt Catholic High School and YMCA

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Provider Relief Fund + Where Are We Now?

Provider Relief Fund + Where Are We Now?

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

PROVIDER RELIEF FUND (PRF) + WHERE ARE WE NOW?

Provider Relief Fund + Where Are We Now?

Julianne Kipple, healthcare director

 

As we all have experienced over the last several months, the Provider Relief Fund (PRF) Reporting Requirements are constantly evolving. Below is an outline of recent changes to the PRF and a summary of where we are now. The goal is to help providers stay up to speed on current developments and offer insights on next steps.

Next Steps/Takeaways

  • Register in the PRF Portal if you have not done so already
  • Monitor the PRF guidance as to new reporting due date (not announced as of 2.10.2021)
  • Determine methodology of lost revenue calculation your facility wants to pursue, organize, and accumulate data, calculation, and support as needed
  • Create a global expense tracking document to accumulate COVID expenses and the funding stream you are claiming the expense under. This should be an actionable document the provider can review once the reporting portal is open. File should include:
    • COVID related expenses
    • Invoice number/payroll support
    • General ledger account number
    • Narrative/support for intent of the purchase/why is it allowable under the PRF program rules
    • The funding source the expense will be claimed under as an internal control on verifying that the expense has not been claimed under two programs (double-dipping)
    • Include other sources of reimbursement that will need to be offset against the COVID expenses.
  • Assess single audit implications

Recent Updates

December 2020:

  • Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA) was signed including clarification on the PRF and lost revenues

January 15, 2021:

  • The HHS PRF reporting portal was supposed to open 1/15/2021.
  • The HHS website was updated with the portal where providers can register; however, the reporting section is not updated/open.
  • HHS announced the 2/15/2021 reporting deadline has been extended, but HHS has not published the new deadline.
  • HHS released updated reporting requirements in response to the CAA being signed
    • Various options on how to calculate lost revenue
      • difference between 2019 and 2020 actual patient care revenue
      • difference between 2020 budgeted and 2020 actual patient care revenue (budget must be approved prior to 3/27/2020 – providers will need to submit additional documentation)
      • calculated by any reasonable method of estimating revenue (providers must submit methodology/support for calculation – increased likelihood of an audit by HRSA)
    • These PRF Reporting Requirements do not apply to:
      • Nursing Home Infection Control distribution. If you received payment from the Nursing Home Infection Control distribution, you should still register in the PRF Reporting Portal.
      • Rural Health Clinic Testing distribution. If your only PRF payment was the Rural Health Clinic Testing Distribution, you should not register in the PRF Reporting Portal. For information about the Rural Health Clinic Testing reporting requirements, contact RHCCOVID-19Testing@hrsa.gov and learn more at the Rural Health Clinic Testing website. https://www.hrsa.gov/rural-health/coronavirus/frequently-asked-questions#rhc.
      • HRSA’s COVID-19 Claims Reimbursement to Health Care Providers and Facilities for Testing, Treatment, and Vaccine Administration for the Uninsured Program.
    • In January, HHS made additional payments to providers through the general and targeted distributions along with COVID-19 claims reimbursement for testing/treatment of uninsured patients
    • Recent highlighted FAQs from the HHS Website:
      • Can I use 2020 budgeted revenues as a basis for reporting lost revenues? (Modified 1/28/2021) When reporting use of Provider Relief Fund money toward lost revenues attributable to coronavirus, Reporting Entities may use budgeted revenues if the budget(s) and associated documents covering calendar year 2020 were established and approved on or before March 26, 2020. To be considered an approved budget, the budget must have been ratified, certified, or adopted by the Reporting Entity’s financial executive or executive officer as of that date, and the Reporting Entity will be required to attest that the budget was established and approved on or before March 26, 2020. Documents related to the budget, including the approval, must be maintained in accordance with the Terms and Conditions.
      • If an entity incurred enough lost revenue in April and May 2020 to justify its use of the Provider Relief Fund payments received, can it only report those two months? (Modified 1/28/2021) Recipients have multiple options to calculate lost revenue as outlined in the Post-Payment Notice of Reporting Requirements. However, for each of these options, the Reporting Entity must report revenue for the full calendar year 2020. If funds were not expended in full by December 31, 2020, then a second and final report will be required on use of funds for the period January 1, 2021 – June 30, 2021, which is due no later than July 31, 2021.
      • If a provider administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a patient that has Medicare Part A, but not Part B, coverage, can the provider use Provider Relief Fund payments to cover the unreimbursed costs associated with vaccine administration? (Added 1/28/2021) The costs associated with administering a vaccine to a patient with Medicare Part A, but not Part B, coverage would be considered unreimbursed under the Provider Relief Fund. Payments could be used to cover incurred expenses.
      • Can Provider Relief Fund payments be used to support COVID-19 vaccine distribution? (Modified 1/28/2021) Provider Relief Fund payments may be used to support expenses associated with the distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine licensed or authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that have not been reimbursed from other sources or that other sources are not obligated to reimburse. Funds may also be used ahead of an FDA-licensed or authorized vaccine becoming available. This may include using funds to purchase additional refrigerators or freezers, personnel costs to provide vaccinations, and transportation costs not otherwise reimbursed.

Resources:

Post-Payment Notice of Reporting Requirements – https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/provider-post-payment-notice-of-reporting-requirements-january-2021.pdf

Reporting Requirements and Auditing Homepage – https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/cares-act-provider-relief-fund/reporting-auditing/index.html

Press Release – HHS Announces PRF Reporting Update – https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2021/01/15/hhs-announces-provider-relief-fund-reporting-update.html

PRF Reporting Portal HHS Page – https://www.hhs.gov/coronavirus/cares-act-provider-relief-fund/reporting-auditing/index.html

Direct Link to PRF Portal – https://prfreporting.hrsa.gov/s/

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

julianne kipple

402.827.2075

jkipple@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JULIANNE KIPPLE + HEALTHCARE DIRECTOR

Julianne Kipple is a Healthcare Director at Lutz with over 10 years of professional experience in the healthcare industry. Her expertise is in accounting and consulting services for healthcare facilities, including outsourced CFO services, Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, and Medicaid Disproportionate Share Surveys (DSH).

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Healthcare Financial Management Association, Member
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Revenue Cycle Representative
  • Certified Public Accountant
  • Certified Healthcare Financial Professional
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting, with high distinction, Creighton University, Omaha, NE
  • MBA, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

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OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

Hospital Financial governance

Hospital Financial governance

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

HOSPITAL FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

Hospital Financial Governance

Julianne Kipple, Healthcare Director

 

The hospital board of directors’ role is to serve as the governing body of the hospital. The board is responsible for oversight of the hospital. Board responsibilities include making strategic decisions, hiring and monitoring an effective CEO, ensuring the hospital is providing quality care, overseeing the hospital’s financial wellbeing, staying educated in healthcare industry news and best practices, and representing the hospital in the community. The board is not involved in the day-to-day operations of the hospital. That is management’s responsibility. In today’s complex healthcare environment and responding to a global pandemic, the role of the board is as important as ever.

MISSION AND STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT

The board should develop and review the overall mission and strategy for the hospital. Establishing a mission statement will serve as a guide for long-term goals and policies for the organization. Part of this responsibility is making major strategic decisions on behalf of the hospital in this ever-changing healthcare industry. Setting the overall tone will impact the actions and decisions made by management.

CEO HIRING PROCESS

Effective board oversight includes the CEO hiring process. The hospital should establish a detailed CEO job description and set realistic expectations in line with its strategic goals. Once those key components are firmly established, the board is responsible for the ongoing review and evaluation of the CEO to make sure that these expectations are met. The board helps determine the big picture for the hospital and assists and supports the CEO.

MEDICAL STAFF CREDENTIALING

Board members should be in close communication with the CEO when hiring and reappointing providers. The goal is to ensure that the hospital reliably provides a high quality of care to patients. Part of the board’s responsibility is to oversee the medical staff credentialing process. The CEO must determine that:

  • All hires are properly licensed in the state,
  • There is evidence of proper and completed training from an accredited school,
  • There has been no history of disciplinary actions taken by previous employers,
  • Hires have proper and current malpractice insurance, and
  • Valid board certifications can be presented.

The board should communicate with the CEO to ensure these measures have been followed and that changes are made should they be necessary.

FINANCIAL HEALTH OVERSIGHT

The board oversees the financial health of the hospital. In the healthcare industry, the board must understand and ensure that the hospital is best using its resources. With the COVID-19 pandemic, the provider relief fund, changing payment models, and cuts in reimbursement for critical access hospitals, it has become even more important for boards to have a thorough understanding of the financial wellbeing of the hospital and how to make strategic decisions. The board should build policies that allow them to reconvene regularly to ensure that financial goals are being met, whether via virtual meetings or in person. These regular checks allow the board to modify any goals that are not being met or allocate funds elsewhere to ensure the hospital is finding the best ways to earn a profit.

CONTINUED BOARD EDUCATION

In the healthcare industry, board education is of utmost importance. For the board to set a stable long-term direction for the hospital, members need to understand all the hospital services, needs, and trends in the healthcare environment. Board members should engage in continuing education to develop a high level of understanding of the hospital and the health care field, as well as areas most essential to effectiveness and performance. In the critical access hospital industry, there are specific financial and reimbursement issues that board members should understand to make fast and informed decisions.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

The board also needs to make a strong effort to help the community succeed. One avenue to help the community and hospital succeed is to create and maintain a foundation that focuses on community outreach and fundraising. This creates a relationship between the hospital and community that fosters growth and support. For critical access hospitals, the relationship with the community is vital to the success of the hospital.

The board of directors can have a lasting and positive impact on not only the hospital but also the community. Educating and retaining effective board members can help hospitals navigate the complicated and changing healthcare industry. If you have any questions, please contact us. You can also learn more about the responsibilities of hospital board members in this article.

 

Sources:

“Overview of Board Roles & Responsibilities” Boardroom Basics – Minnesota Hospital and Healthcare Partnership

“The Guide to Good Governance for Hospital Boards” – The American Hospital Association’s Center for Healthcare Governance (2009)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

julianne kipple

402.827.2075

jkipple@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JULIANNE KIPPLE + HEALTHCARE DIRECTOR

Julianne Kipple is a Healthcare Director at Lutz with over 10 years of professional experience in the healthcare industry. Her expertise is in accounting and consulting services for healthcare facilities, including outsourced CFO services, Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement, and Medicaid Disproportionate Share Surveys (DSH).

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Healthcare Financial Management Association, Member
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Revenue Cycle Representative
  • Certified Public Accountant
  • Certified Healthcare Financial Professional
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting, with high distinction, Creighton University, Omaha, NE
  • MBA, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

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We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

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All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

24‐Hour Stay Rule: Bill LB 783

24‐Hour Stay Rule: Bill LB 783

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

24‐HOUR STAY RULE: BILL LB 783

24-hour stay rule: bill lb 783

matt shonsey, tax director
jerad knott, tax shareholder

Those living in Nebraska and involved with ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) likely know about Bill LB 783, a major change to ASCs. Before this bill, ASCs in Nebraska had a length of stay requiring discharge the same day when surgery occurred. Now the bill allows patients to extend their stay to include an overnight stay.

Essentially, the bill matches Nebraska law with the national ASC law through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, with some minor differences. What does the new bill entail, and how will it affect Nebraskans?

 

How Long Will the Bill Extend ASC Stays?

LB 783 extends Nebraska’s length of stay requirements for ASCs from same working day to “within twenty-four hours after the introduction of anesthesia for persons for whom anesthesia is administered.” This allows patients to stay overnight as long as they are discharged within 23 hours and 59 minutes from receiving anesthesia.

This is a great alternative to an overnight stay in a hospital, which is a higher cost option. Since they began primarily in the 1990s, ASCs have brought quality medical care to individuals and gained a track record of having successful outcomes. With the passage of this bill, ASCs will be able to provide surgeons an opportunity to perform many approved procedures previously only performed in a hospital setting.

 

When Will the Bill Officially Become Law and How Do You Evaluate the Opportunity to Consider This?

On November 11, 2020, this bill became official. Nebraska ASCs desiring to take advantage of this law change will still need to review whether their facility is set up to accommodate this extended‐stay surgery; plus, do they have types of outpatient surgical cases requiring extended stays? If so, what equipment needs will this require; and finally, are the surgeons willing to bring these types of cases to the ASCs?

 

Continued Changes in Today’s Healthcare

The passage of this bill is another step in the process of making today’s healthcare more affordable, convenient, and friendly in a proven safe environment. The continued advances and improvements in the skill level of surgeons, surgical instruments and equipment, and pharmacy and anesthesia are allowing ASCs to become the preferred location for most outpatient surgical procedures today, and LB 783 has certainly expanded this opportunity. If you have any questions related to reviewing your opportunities to allowing your ASC to evaluate the possible benefit of utilizing LB 783, please contact us.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

308.384.9910

mshonsey@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

3320 JAMES ROAD

SUITE 100

GRAND ISLAND, NE 68803

MATT SHONSEY + TAX DIRECTOR

Matt Shonsey is a Tax Director at Lutz with over 38 years of experience in taxation. He specializes in tax planning and consulting for individuals and businesses, as well as healthcare accounting and consulting.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Tax
  • Audit
  • Healthcare Accounting & Consulting
  • Estate & Gift Planning
  • Agriculture Industry
  • Healthcare Industry
  • Franchise Industry
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA, University of Nebraska, Kearney, NE
  • Graduate Studies in Accounting, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Grand Island Community Foundation, Past Board Member
  • St. Francis Medical Center, Past Board Member
  • College Park of Grand Island, Past Board Member
  • Grand Island Economic Development Corporatin, Past Board Member
  • Community Health Charities, Past Council Member
  • Stuhr Museum Foundation, Past Council Member
  • Heartland Events Center - Major Gifts Committee, Past Co-Chair
  • College Park Campaigns - Major Gifts Committee, Past Co-Chair
  • 2005/2006 Heartland United Way Campaign, Past Co-Chair
  • State Volleyball Fundraising Committee, Past Chair Member
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
Jerad Knott

308.398.1545

jknott@lutz.us

3320 JAMES ROAD

SUITE 100

GRAND ISLAND, NE 68803

JERAD KNOTT + TAX SHAREHOLDER

Jerad Knott is a Tax Shareholder at Lutz with over ten years of experience in taxation. He provides tax planning, research, compliance and consulting services to privately held companies.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA, Hastings College, Hastings, NE
  • MBA, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Ashland City Council, Past Councilman
  • Ashland Planning Commission, Member
  • ClubRed (American Red Cross), Board Member
  • Project Extra Mile, Past Board Member

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850

12.9.2020 | Preparing & Reviewing Medicare Cost Reports | Recording

12.9.2020 | Preparing & Reviewing Medicare Cost Reports | Recording

 

LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

Preparing & Reviewing Medicare Cost Reports

12.9.2020 | preparing & reviewing medicare cost reports | Recording

This webinar covers important cost report preparation and review topics that can have a significant impact on Medicare reimbursement for your facility.

RECENT POSTS

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTERS!

We tap into the vast knowledge and experience within our organization to provide you with monthly content on topics and ideas that drive and challenge your company every day.

Toll-Free: 866.577.0780  |  Privacy Policy

All content © Lutz & Company, PC

OMAHA

13616 California Street, Suite 300

Omaha, NE 68154

P: 402.496.8800

HASTINGS

747 N Burlington Avenue, Suite 401

Hastings, NE 68901

P: 402.462.4154

LINCOLN 

115 Canopy Street, Suite 200

Lincoln, NE 68508

P: 531.500.2000

GRAND ISLAND

3320 James Road, Suite 100

Grand Island, NE 68803

P: 308.382.7850