LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

net working capital: what is it and how is it used?

bill kenedy, LUTZ consulting and m&a shareholder

 

A commonly misunderstood topic in M&A transactions is the concept of net working capital (NWC). This is recognized as a predetermined amount of capital that is included in the purchase price in a business sale transaction. Understanding what NWC encompasses and how this amount is calculated is an important step in the  M&A process.

 

What is Net Working Capital?

Net Working Capital is a measure of operating liquidity available to a business at a given point in time. Major NWC accounts include accounts receivables, inventory and accounts payable. In short, it can be calculated as your business’s current assets (less cash) minus its current liabilities. Here is an example calculation for NWC:

 Values from the balance sheet

 

Net Working Capital in Business Transactions

In most transactions, NWC stays with the company being acquired as it is considered a necessary operating asset of the business. However, by monthly tracking of collections, payments, and inventory levels, sellers of a business can minimize the amount of money locked up in NWC in order to retain more cash when the business sells.

For example, if the selling company has historically paid its vendors in 15 days even though they have 30 day payment terms, the company could adjust their payment timing to increase cash on hand and reduce NWC.  This change would need to occur well before starting an M&A process (more than a year).

The reason for needed to work on your NWC well before embarking on an M&A process is that most buyers will require a NWC peg based on the company’s historical averages.

A problem with relying on historical results is that the information can often be skewed. Seasonality, peaks and troughs, can often affect the validity of a company’s historical results of NWC. To get a more accurate estimate, buyers will establish “trends” by analyzing a company’s historical NWC over a 12-18 month period.

 

Overall, not understanding and addressing net working capital issues earlier in the M&A process could have a significant impact on the business transaction and the ultimate amount of cash the seller realizes from the transaction. If you have any questions regarding net working capital, please contact Lutz M&A.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

bill kenedy

402.492.2132

bkenedy@lutz.us

BILL KENEDY + LUTZ CONSULTING AND M&A SHAREHOLDER

Bill Kenedy is a Lutz Consulting and M&A Shareholder at Lutz. He specializes in business valuation, litigation support, and merger and acquisition advisory services.

AREAS OF FOCUS
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Nebraska Society of Certified Public Accountants, Member
  • Certified Public Accountant
  • Accredited in Business Valuation
  • Certified in Financial Forensic
  • Certified Exit Planning Advisor
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA in Accounting, St. John’s University, Collegeville, MN
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Construction Financial Management Association, Past Treasurer, Board Member
  • A Time to Heal (non-profit focused on cancer patients), Board Member

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