LUTZ BUSINESS INSIGHTS

 

should i sign a “recruiter right to represent” contract?

jason orme, client relations lead

 

As a job candidate, you’re always seeking new leads that may steer you to a new and exciting career. If a recruiter contacts you with the possibility of your dream job, you’re likely to jump at the opportunity. After all, the job market can be tough, and anything you can do to improve your odds is well worth it. Some recruiters will ask you to sign a Recruiter Right to Represent contract. Should you sign? Before you can make that decision, you need to understand what this contract is and how signing can affect you professionally.  

 

What Is a Recruiter Right to Represent Contract? 

It is an agreement between a job candidate and a recruiter that gives the recruiter exclusive rights to represent them for contract positions. While it has advantages, such as protecting the parties involved, it is also not without risks, especially for the candidate. That’s why it’s vital that you carefully read and understand the entire contract before signing. Remember, this contract is drafted by the recruiter’s firm to first and foremost protect their interest.

 

Why Are Right to Represent Contracts Used? 

Basically, these contracts are used for insurance. A good recruiter will vet all their candidates before they send their resumes to any firm, and their candidates will often get priority attention. Likewise, they make sure that the candidate is aware of the position that they’re being presented for. A Right to Represent contract also ensures the hiring firm that the candidate agrees to be represented for the position only by this firm. Some companies require these contracts whenever a third party is submitting information for a prospect.

 

When Should I Sign a Right to Represent Contract? 

In some cases, you won’t have any chance of applying for, or landing, a position unless a reputable recruiter represents you. So, it may well be in your best interest to sign the contract. But, just like any legal document you would sign, you need to read every word very carefully, especially the fine print. Your professional future may well rest upon the decision to sign with a recruiter or not, and you can’t afford to make a mistake. Pay close attention to the following details of the contract. 

 

Understand the Length of the Contract 

Often, recruiters use Right to Represent contracts for a specific position at an organization. Make sure their representation is limited to one circumstance. You don’t want the contract to hinder your ability to apply for other roles or work with other agencies on different positions.

Broad Right to Represent contracts give the recruiter the right to express your interest in any position they think is suitable. You do not want to give up this right if you are confidentially looking for a position, or you are keeping your options open and working with multiple agencies. 

 

What Type of Right to Represent Contract Is Best? 

Both types of contracts listed below offer you benefits. You just have to decide what’s most important to you at this stage of your career. It also may depend upon how you and the recruiter became acquainted in the first place. Are they the ones who initiated contact, or was it you? If they contacted you, it’s wise to be a bit wary until you know more about them and make sure you’re fully aware of their reputation.  It is important to build a good relationship with your recruiter, and you should trust each-other.  If, at any point, you feel pressured to sign something that you haven’t had time to read and fully understand, find a different recruiter to work with; it’s your choice and career.

 

Single-Position Right to Represent Contracts 

A recruiter who knows that your qualifications meet the criteria of a specific firm’s position will want to promote you. They are solely focused on filling the position for their client and will only send over candidates that they feel are a good fit. The recruiter will ask for a Single Position Right to Represent contract, in this instance, for a specific period of time. It will only be valid for one position, and you are free to work with other recruiters and agencies to pursue other opportunities. This contract is the most reasonable contract and something that some clients do require.

 

Broad Right to Represent Contracts  

As the name implies, a broad Right to Represent contract gives the recruiter the right to promote you to any number of companies for a variety of positions for an extended period of time. It may be a good option if you want a wide range of opportunities to choose from, but be careful. Remember that you’ll be bound to the terms of the agreement, and you may not be able to work with any other agency until you’re contractually free. Especially be wary if this agreement is limiting you to only working with one recruiter for your entire job search process.  Good recruiters should have your best interest in mind and wouldn’t expect you to keep all of your eggs in their basket. 

 

Learn More About Right to Represent Contracts and Recruitment 

At the end of the day, only you can decide which type of contract works best for you. But, before you make any commitment to a recruiter, make sure that you can work with them effectively. Pay attention to what they say, what they promise, and what they expect of you. If it feels good, you’re on the right track. If not, keep looking for a recruiter you feel comfortable with. 

Everyone here at Lutz understands that you are more than just a resume. We have never encouraged a candidate to sign a broad right to represent contract. We take the time to get to know your goals, strengths, skills, concerns, interests and personality to find the right fit for you. We also know that the recruitment process can be confusing and that you might have questions. Contact us if you’re still unsure about whether you should sign a contract, or if you want more information about how a recruiter can help you advance your career.  

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jason Orme Lutz Talent

402.827.2039

jorme@lutz.us

LINKEDIN

JASON ORME + CLIENT RELATIONS MANAGER

Jason Orme is a Client Relations Manager at Lutz Talent with over seven years of experience. He is responsible for helping business leaders find the best long-term talent to reach their business goals.

AREAS OF FOCUS
  • Recruiting
  • Accounting and Finance Industry
  • Networking
AFFILIATIONS AND CREDENTIALS
  • Institute for Internal Auditors - Aksarben Chapter, Member
  • Association for Corporate Growth - Nebraska Chapter, Member
EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
  • BSBA, Public & Private Accounting, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO
  • BSBA, Corporate Finance, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO
  • MBA, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO
COMMUNITY SERVICE
  • Omaha Ducks Unlimited Chapter, Chairman

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